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737 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

Melon & Feta Salad

  • by PeteModerator

  It seems we have finally gotten some typical August weather. Our summer, as a whole, has been rather cool with most nights dropping down into the 60’s and days rarely surpassing 80-85°F. In fact, we turned the air conditioner off sometime in July and haven’t turned back on since. But with the warmer weather, we like to eat lighter and try not to do much cooking in the house. That often means lots of salads, and while I like salads I find they can get boring rather quickly, meat lover that I am, so we try to change it up every so often.   This salad is a slight... read more

Bacon & Corn Relish

  • by PeteModerator

  It won’t be long before another corn season is behind us, here in Wisconsin. Then we will have to rely on frozen corn or corn that was picked thousands of miles away and shipped to us. I won’t even mention the canned stuff. The frozen stuff isn’t bad, in fact it often is a better choice than the “fresh” stuff in winter. At least the frozen stuff is picked at its peak of ripeness and processed within days of picking. The ears of corn you see at stores, in winter, were shipped thousands of miles to make it to the local megamart, and who knows how long ago it was... read more

How To Make Old Fashioned NY Sour Corn Rye Bread

I love rye bread. Buying great rye bread here in NYC is easy. Making it is a different story! Here are my attempts to create an old fashioned NY Sour Corn Rye. First up is my latest attempt. It part of the Magnificent Maggie Glezer Adventure, and id awfully good.     This is the real deal, tight crumb, chewy crust, big flavor!       First things first, converted a firm starter a la Maggie, to a rye starter with two rye feedings.     Here's a little departure from Izzy's NY Rye, which is now a close second in my heart. The "ferments" for only 15-20... read more

Want to customize your uniform? Know your options.

Many people outfit themselves or their employees in uniforms because they want to look, well, uniform. But nobody wants to look completely identical to their coworkers.  One of key ways to make yourself or your brand stand out is by adding some decoration elements to a uniform. There are a variety of options available out there for you to choose from. Below we outline the three most popular types of garment decoration and their respective pros and cons.   Embroidery Embroidery is one of the most common decoration techniques used on uniforms. For example, it is... read more

Elotes-Corn on the Cob, Mexican Style

  • by PeteModerator

  I first discovered Elote when I was living in Chicago. There were all these Mexican street vendors in my neighborhood pushing carts and selling, what I discovered, was corn on the cob. But this wasn’t ordinary corn on the cob has I had known it. Instead of slathering it with butter, salt and pepper they slathered it in mayonnaise, dipped it in grated cheese and sprinkled it with ground chile and a squeeze of fresh lime. I have to admit, at first I was kind of disgusted. Mayo on corn on the cob?! But being a chef and a rather adventurous sort I had to give it a try.... read more

The BLT-A Case for Food Snobbery

  • by PeteModerator

  I don’t consider myself to be a food snob. Sure, after years of cooking in high end restaurants I can extol the virtues of foie gras, debate whether American or New Zealand lamb is superior, or lose myself in discussions of the world’s greatest cheeses, but I also love to debate the best fat to meat ratio of a properly made burger, lose myself to the comfort of great diner food, and swap secrets to making the best chili. I think yellow mustard has its rightful place as a condiment of choice, I like salads made of iceberg lettuce, but worst of all, late at night I... read more

How Culinary Arts Teachers Decide What to Teach

How do Culinary Arts teachers decide what to teach? What we teach and how we teach are delineated by several factors:   Who is your employer? The availability of tools and equipment Time available for hands-on instruction Your budget Your skills Class composition Food allergies   Who is your employer?     Many schools particularly at the post-secondary level (especially if they’re part of a chain of schools like the Culinary Institute of America) will have a preexisting curriculum. What is a curriculum? A curriculum is a course of study. Most schools,... read more

A Tale of Two Crepes - The Delectable Okonomiyaki

  Okonomiyaki is the epitome of Japanese comfort food, a dish that’s readily available throughout Japan. At first glance, it looks like an example of fusion cuisine where the western technique of making crepes was incorporated into the yaki culinary technique of cooking on a hot iron grill. In this video link to YouTube that features the production of various types of Japanese street food at various yatai or food stalls, at the 8 minute and 27 second mark, you can watch the production of a Hiroshima style of okonomiyaki. In the video, crepe batter is ladled and... read more

Trends in Kitchen shirts

  The old standard in kitchen shirts is facing some new competition. Gone are the days where the cooks all wear white cook shirts. With more and more restaurants designing open kitchens and other elements that allow diners to see the people who make their food, restaurants have become more mindful of the image their cooks present and are expanding their options.   Don’t get us wrong, the standard cook shirt is a great option.  Kitchen whites will forever be a classic uniform, and nothing screams that your kitchen is spotless and safe than a line cooking wearing a... read more

Hot Fudge Sauce

  • by PeteModerator

  One of my favorite memories, from growing up, was making homemade ice cream.  We didn't have one of those electric types.  No, we had an old-fashioned ice cream churn.  You know the type; wooden barrel, metal container and wooden dasher to churn the ice cream.  You would fill the metal container with your ice cream mix, place it in the barrel, attach the dasher to the crank. then fill the barrel with a mixture of rock salt and ice.  Then the cranking would begin.  It seemed to take forever for that ice cream to get made.  The whole family would take turns cranking... read more

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