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596 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

Gumbo-A Taste of the Bayou

  • by PeteModerator

  It occurs to me that I write often about the foods and drinks of New Orleans. I’m not sure why the city and its food has left such an indelible mark on me. I only spent about 6 months living there, while doing a culinary internship, but there is something about the food of that city that has made a lasting impression. The city is proud of its culinary heritage, a meld of Old World and New. The cuisine is a true American invention, a blend of cuisines from France, Spain, Africa, and the Caribbean along with the bounty of New World food stuffs. I think this is what... read more

Discovering an Old Favorite-A Pancake Recipe

  • by PeteModerator

  I don’t buy a lot of new cookbooks anymore. There are a couple of reasons for this; I already have hundreds, I have a limited space for my collection, and I occasionally receive new cookbooks for the purpose of reviewing them. That’s not to say that I don’t buy cookbooks. It’s just that my focus has changed. In the past year or so I have been actively collecting vintage cookbooks and cooking pamphlets, you know the ones, pamphlets that come with new appliances, and those put out by various food boards, promoting the use of their products. These pamphlets were quite... read more

Progressive Ideas (A Restaurant Review)

  • by kuanModerator

Do we need more pictures of food from Travail?   Why not? I don't quite remember what everything was as there was just too much to remember.   Oysters and Tapioca Pearl pudding, chive oil.  Lemon gelee garnished with a Nasturtium leaf, cauliflower puree and salmon roe.         Hamachi and lemon "taco."  Panacotta with prune glaze and candied hazelnut.  Summer sausage with deviled eggs.  Tomatoes with parsley oil and soy glaze.  Compressed watermelon.         Does this count as a course or is it an amuse bouche?  Fried chicken skin with more watermelon.... read more

Fabricating a Saddle of Lamb

  • by kuanModerator

This is a saddle of lamb.  This is what appears in the grocery store cut up as lamb chops.  Lambs meant for the grocery store are butchered into thirds and this is the middle.  This is also where the rack of lamb comes from, only this has section of ribs that wraps around removed.  It also has the "tenderloin" section attached which makes it sort of like a small T-bone roast.  In the foreground next to the saddle are new potatoes and in the background are heirloom variety tomatoes, blanched and peeled.         Here I'm boning out the loins.  I boned them so the... read more

Dinner With Team USA

  • by kuanModerator

We were fortunate to have Team USA make us dinner.  Yes, there is a Team USA and they compete every four years at the International Kochkunst Austellung, aka the Culinary Olympics, or affectionately, the Kochkunst.     We started with passed appetizers.  There were four types, a yellow tomato gazpacho with lump crab shooter where the tomato juice was separated using a centrifuge, a tuna tartare in a nori wasabi wafer cone, a chevre cheese cake, and a pulled pork corn cake on a spoon.  The yellow tomato gazpacho was beyond amazing.  Yellow tomatoes are only available... read more

Waffles! Technique Technique Technique!

  • by kuanModerator

So you say you want a recipe?  Well today's your lucky day, I am not grumpy, so here goes:   I love waffles.  The perfect waffle is a combination of technique and ingredients.  The type of ingredients matter, the proportions can be approximate.  Technique matters, but if you've flubbed a couple of things your waffles will still taste great. There's just one thing.  Do not overbeat your egg whites.  Did I say technique matters?         A few notes on the ingredients.  Use fresh baking powder and baking soda.  Use real butter.  Use a good vanilla.  Notice the... read more

Pictures from the ACF Convention in Kansas City

  • by kuanModerator

My last ACF convention was in Chicago 14 years ago.  A lot has changed since then.  Students are getting better and the food is more complex.  Chefs are creating amazing things using lesser cuts of meat, budgets are getting tighter, kitchen brigade styles are changing, and so on and so on.   Anyway here is a glimpse of what happens at these conventions.  The following group of five photos are from the Chef of the Year competition.  Four finalists compete.  Each chef has to present four different dishes.  One of each, for a total of four different dishes, has to be... read more

Simple and Elegant - Lamb with Sauce

  • by kuanModerator

This post is all about sauce, a really simple sauce, and a really simple way to make a special dinner for a special guest.  I always say cooking is not complicated and this is as uncomplicated as it gets.  No fancy recipes just plain off the shelf ingredients.  Here I present a simple dish comprised of lamb loin medallions trimmed off a lamb chop and a wine reduction demiglace.  If you are organized it should take about 30 minutes.  If not, add ten minutes.   I got a package of lamb chops from Costco which are actually lamb T-Bones.  These include the same muscle as a... read more

Fondant Potatoes

  • by kuanModerator

Fondant potatoes are potatoes browned in a pan and then glazed with reduced stock.  These can be done in 20 minutes.  Try this if you're tired of microwaved baked potatoes.   Peel and slice the potatoes so they're between 3/4 and an inch thick.  Next preheat your pan.  Hot pan, cold oil, food won't stick.  The pan needs to be hot enough so the oil dances on the surface when you add the oil. Naturally since I had I used duck fat laying around I went ahead and used it.  Why not?       Folks think I'm kidding but here's how well it works.  No need to pay extra for... read more

Classic and Quick Apple Cobbler

  • by kuanModerator

This is one the quickest fly by the seat of your pants desserts you can make.  Here it pays to develop your knife skills.  I use a Suntoku.  If you were really badass you can use any knife like This guy.  I'm not that good but still, this way saves a good amount of time.   I like to slice my apples about a 1/4" thick. I find they don't overcook and turn into mush this way.  Once again no recipe.  If you have to have a recipe Google is your friend.  My rule of thumb is one medium apple per individual serving.   Coat the apples with sugar, a little flour, and cinnamon.... read more

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