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467 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

A Brining We Shall Do

In my XX number of years in the kitchen, believe it or not, I have never brined anything.  Well, I did once, unfortunately I brined a turkey that already had 8% salt solution enhancement, ACK!  It was a Thanksgiving of side dishes only, so I never tried it again, until now. All of the turkeys or parts thereof, that I have prepared, I’ve  just chucked into the oven and said a pray, oh please kitchen gods, let my meal be good this once?  Recently, I have been buying Jenny-O turkey breast tenderloins that are already flavored.  It took me till now to look at more than... read more

How To Make White Stock

    Stock. It is essential to serious cooking. Walk into any restaurant that aspires to prepare fine cuisine and you will undoubtedly see a large pot of stock gently bubbling somewhere in the kitchen. In French cuisine, stock is so important that it is called "fond," which translates into "foundation." Chefs frequently compare cooking (and culinary training) to building a house. As any architect knows, a strong foundation, while never really seen, is of greatest importance. If the foundation is weak, what is built on it will be unstable--especially if it is destined to... read more

My Evening With Durangojo

My husband and I took off on a month long car trip to celebrate our benchmark wedding anniversary.  As we were driving back home, both of us commented on how much we enjoyed ending our adventure with Durangojo, also known as Joey.  It was the perfect way to round out our month. We like Durango Colorado very much; we’ve been here a few times now, but this visit was something special.  First off, there was the hair-raising experience just to get there. We came in from Cheyenne Wyoming, through Wolf Creek Pass, over the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains.  Wouldn’t... read more

Polenta's Potential Predicated

Polenta. What is it exactly?  It sounds like something exotic and crazy.  But really, it is such a simple dish that has the potential to be extraordinary!  For those of you who grew up in the south, polenta is no more than Italian grits.  Now I know some will cry out that "Grits and polenta aren't the same thing!"  Well, yes and no.  You see polenta and grits share some very fundamental and basic attributes.  Polenta and grits are both essentially dried ground corn that is slow cooked in hot liquid to make a porridge like concoction.  Both can be cooked with water alone,... read more

Florida Lobster - Out of the kitchen and into the Ocean!

  Miles from shore floating gently along glassy water, a soft breeze rustling the dive flag and maybe a cold beverage in hand. It's as beautiful a place as I have ever seen and a treasure of my home state. The Florida Keys – is unlike any other place in the United States. Less than 100 miles from Cuba and even closer to the Bahamas. Twice a year this place explodes with activity as fisherman from far and wide partake in the annual lobster season.   Florida’s lobster season is a popular recreational sport in part because all you really need to be effective is a mask... read more

The Juicesizer

Check out this video from ChefTalk's newest sponsor, Juicesizer!  They're looking to share their new easy-to-use juice squeezer with you.  Take a look at the video below and visit their page here.     read more

Top Chef & The Long Road Paved with Poorly Cut Vegetables

The Oberod Estate is not tucked, nestled or otherwise hidden from the sight from the road. Rather, it is a castle-like stone manse on top of a manicured, green field, stretching to a forest’s edge. It is an unabashed take on imperial living. The approach is a black topped, asphalt cut-out that climbs through the field, with the luxury car commercial-style ‘S’ curves, complete with a summit view. This is no ordinary house, as the painted white signs at the flagstone entry direct “visitors” and “deliveries” to opposite ends of the gray palace. I parked my unassuming Jeep... read more

Jackets And Toques The History Of The Chef Uniform

  Chefs, for the most part, wear their uniforms almost every day of their working lives, replete with toque, checked pants and double-breasted jacket. Though these uniforms are ubiquitous in the foodservice industry worldwide, they are often taken for granted and worn without much thought. However, many may find that the origin and reasons behind traditional chef's attire are as interesting as it looks. Much of the chef's uniform has developed out of necessity. The jacket, for example, is double-breasted so it can easily be reversed to hide stains that may... read more

How To Use A Chef Knife Part II

In our last class session, we discussed the importance of knives and learned how to judge the quality of a knife. In this class we will look at which knives any well-organized kitchen should have, and how to keep them sharp. A trip to a cooking store will reveal a wide array of different knives. They vary in length, thickness and function. While each knife is valuable, I consider the following 5 knives essential tools for any serious cooking: Chef knife-This is the workhorse knife that chefs reach for the most often, and for that reason it is the most important... read more

How To Use A Chef Knife Part III With Photos

Part II Basics with the chef knife Most chefs would probably agree that the chef knife is their most important weapon in the arsenal of kitchen tools. It is the professional chef's constant companion, a reliable side-kick. Aside from basic workhorse cutting, the chef knife is an extremely versatile knife capable of performing a wide range of different jobs. The chef knife can cut very delicate items as well as break small bones by using different ends of the blade. It can also dice, mince, or if necessary, reduce something to a virtual puree. I have even seen... read more

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