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Breville Je98xl Juice Fountain Plus

    Breville Je98xl Juice Fountain Plus Juicer   Reviewed By Peter Martin Donated by www.everythingkitchens.com     I recently had the opportunity to try out the new Juice Fountain Plus juicer from Breville.  I had been contemplating adding a juicer to my kitchen for awhile now as part of my plan to start leading a healthier lifestyle.  While the healthier lifestyle hasn’t really come to fruition-and who can blame me, with the holidays coming up-I have had a lot of fun experimenting with my new juicer.     For the benefit of those new to this... read more

Italian American Celebration Feast Of Seven Fishes

  Story and photos by Becky Billingsley   Long ago somewhere in Italy's southern coastal instep it became tradition to celebrate Christmas Eve with a long multi-course dinner to symbolize waiting for the birth of Baby Jesus. Today the Feast of Seven Fishes is enthusiastically continued by Italian-American families.     The fish part of the tradition comes from the geography of the place it started: it's near the coast where there is an abundance of seafood. In the late 19th and early 20th century when a surge in Italian emigrants brought Italian flavors to... read more

Nape

Means to coate with a sauce. read more

Garnish: Not Just Gratituous Greenery

OK, so what is a garnish? What does that mean? Quite simply, a garnish is just something that makes food look better and gives a little pop. Most people think that garnishing food is only reserved for restaurants or the Martha Stewart types out there. I am here to let you in on a little secret. Garnishes don't have to be elaborate or hard. Even the simplest little touches can add a world of eye appeal to a dish or plate.   The basics of garnishing can be broken down into a few guidelines. First of all, your biggest allies are color and contrast. Food is beautiful.... read more

How To Prepare Vinaigrette

The French term "vinaigrette" tends to make something which is beautifully simple sound unnecessarily complex. In its most basic form, a vinaigrette is nothing more than a mixture of oil and vinegar. It is the oldest taste combination, a fat balanced with an acid. Oils, because they are liquid at room temperature, provide the palate with a supple mouth feel and act as an excellent flavor carrier for other ingredients. To "cut" the fat, adding another taste sensation and stopping the oil from coating the palate is the task of an acid, typically vinegar. In short the only... read more

How To Use A Chef Knife Part I

The most important tool on the kitchen? Even though chefs disagree about almost everything, most, if not all would agree that knives are the most important tool. Without their knives--their own personal knives--chefs would not perform as well as they do. It's like a professional musician who intimately knows how his or her own particular instrument plays. Knives are the one thing in the kitchen that are absolutely worth spending the money on. A good knife will last decades and may even be passed down to the next generation. But how do you know which knives are the best?... read more

Going Electronic in the Kitchen

Bringing Technology to the Kitchen     A computer is handy for a cook FOR the kitchen in streaming cooking shows or tutorials off of youtube. It's a great resource for new recipes or for your old family recipes as well. But a computer hasn't been handy to have IN the kitchen. A keyboard to fill with debris and spills, same for the mouse. And where do you put the monitor? Not to mention all the cables. Now with smartphones and tablets, you have some options to help you out smoothly and seamlessly.   It would be nice to have a stand to angle the tablet... read more

How to Prepare for a Culinary Job Interview

Preparing for a job interview of any kind involves research. A culinary job interview is no different. Research the restaurant – have they experienced recent growth, are they family-owned or a chain, how long have they been in business? If you have never eaten at the establishment, make a point of sampling the food before the interview. Also, a quick Internet search will yield helpful results such as reviews, press mentions and any possible information on the owners, managers or executive chefs.   At the conclusion of the interview, you may be asked, "Do you have... read more

A Brief Tour of American Barbecue

  • by PeteModerator

Barbecue, barbeque, BBQ, or Bar-B-Que, no matter how you spell it America has developed an insatiable appetite for the stuff.  Restaurants specialize in it, competitions abound, and backyard grill jockeys brag about their deftness at creating perfectly tender, spicy, smoked meats.  But with all this hullaballoo, I would bet that, if you asked the average person to describe barbecue the first thing they would mention is baby back ribs slathered with a sweet and spicy tomato based sauce.  While that certainly is barbecue, it is but one type of barbecue, and one that isn’t... read more

A Brief Introduction To Chorizo

Chorizo   By Dorine Houston   Chorizo is pork sausage of Hispanic origin. It is pronounced choREEtho in Spain and choREEso in Hispanic America. Different countries have different recipes. The first difference for a chef in the US to keep in mind is that Mexican chorizo tastes nothing like the various chorizos from Spain.   Mexican chorizo is flavored with jalapeño peppers, and is generally raw and uncured; it must be cooked. Spanish (meaning only from Spain) chorizo is flavored with smoked paprika and is usually dry-cured; it does not need to be cooked.... read more

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