or Connect
ChefTalk.com › Articles
498 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

Fish Descriptions Part Ii

ChefTalk.com would like to thank Chef Charles Weber of Riva Restaurant in Chicago, Il. for sharing some of his fast knowledge about fish. Recently Chef Weber put together a comprehensive document of fish descriptions for his wait staff to help educate them about the subject. At our last Chef's Journal we asked Chef Weber if he would share it with the ChefTalk community and he was more than happy to do so. The list is very comprehensive, in fact, the list is so comprehensive that we have broken it up into two parts. SEARCH TIP *(If you are looking for a particular... read more

Wild Maine Blueberries

Uncultivated taste and manners. That's what you can expect from a wild Maine blueberry. The tiny wild, blueberries native to Maine and Eastern Canada have a sharper, more distinct sweet and tart flavor when compared with cultivated blueberries grown in other parts of the country. And they are wild: grown and nourished with whatever sun and rain nature dishes out that season. The lowbush, wild blueberry (vaccinium augustifolium) thrives in the glacial soils and northern climate of Maine and the Canadian Maritimes. Called blueberry barrens, these "fields" look like... read more

Infiltrating The Kitchen!

For those who are interested, I did it. For one day, I was a cook in a commercial kitchen. The whole day really seemed like a lucid dream. In parts, it was like I was living a POV day-in-the-life docudrama.   It started routinely enough. I woke at 6:30am having packed my work clothes and knife roll the night before. My brain hadn't allowed me much sleep as I went through every scenario to give me the best chance of not screwing ANYTHING up. The nagging fear of failure coupled with REM made it feel like I had a bumblebee stuck in my skull all night desperately looking... read more

Recycling Used Oil From Your Kitchen

As the air grows cooler and the long days of summer grow shorter and shorter, a whole new season of comfort food swings into action. Football and hockey games, end of season baseball and the rugby world cup will drive fans to bars and grills across the country. Late night college crowds will begin to stumble into after-hours cafes and restaurants, while couples and families look for warm comfort on a plate. Sounds like it's time to start up the fryer. And with that fryer going full tilt, the accumulation of used oil in your kitchen will continue to grow. So what do... read more

A Standard For All Seasons

Have you ever patronized a restaurant that doesn't have salt and pepper on the table?  The assumption is that the food is already properly seasoned, (seasoning primarily refers to salt), and applying more is not only unnecessary, but may be offensive to the chef.  This implies that his or her amount of seasoning is eternally and universally accurate.  I don't mean to offend anyone but I find such a perspective incredibly presumptuous.  Why?  Because this position predicates that everybody's palate is identical.  And that my friends is simply ludicrous.  Biology, age,... read more

Preserving A Hot Trend

A classic way to enjoy figs is as preserves, and chefs throughout coastal South Carolina make them since the area has a prime climate for bumper fig crops. They start turning ripe in July, and the crop continues through August. Pastry Chef Tina Spaltro of the Marina Inn at Grande Dunes in Myrtle Beach, with encouragement from Executive Chef James Clark, figured out how to turn a lot of figs into delicious batch of sweetness. Making the preserves during the late summer of 2009, she says, was a spur-of-the-moment project that turned out well. "It was just a... read more

History And Descriptions Of Chilies

  • by PeteModerator

Written By Chef Peter Martin Sweet Heat It all starts with a slight tingling in the mouth that quickly turns into a light burning sensation.  Your nose starts to run and perspiration beads on your forehead as your eyes turn blurry with tears.  By now your mouth has become a raging river of molten lava, or so it seems.  You have just swallowed a powerful alkaloid that has caused your brain to release neurotransmitters telling your body you are in big trouble.  So who is this insidious poisoner so intent on seeing you suffer?  You are, and mostly likely you will attempt... read more

Oatmeal

by: Chef Jim Berman My younger daughter is, and always has been, quite taken by the color yellow. Yellow teddy bears. Yellow butterfly stickers. Yellow paper for which to make her favorite friend's birthday card. She insists on the yellow set of badly marred, well-worn plastic fork and knife set for every meal. "Is the dishwasher clean?" you can hear before any meal, "I need my stuff."  Yellow is her signature color, if a five year-old is needing of a signature color. And besides, it's rather cute. So it was of no surprise that as we made our way across the just... read more

In The Kitchen At Parties

It is 7:30 on a Saturday night and I'm leaning against a stove sweating. There's music blaring beyond the kitchen doors, but I'm contemplating the next course. We're at that inevitable lull, the point between appetizers and meal. Out front there are announcements to be made and toasts to drink.  We've been rushing since noon, but now we wait. And Sweat. Timing is crucial when cooking for a crowd and it's often dependent on longwinded speeches or announcements. In short, the initial push is a guessing game. It brings to mind a story of a banquet oversaw by chef August... read more

Artichokes Al Judeo

When Chef Michael Altenberg, chef owner of Campagnola in Evanston, IL, told the Chef Forum about a dish that he frequently makes called artichokes al judeo, we at ChefTalk.com were intrigued. This Italian dish, which according to Chef Altenberg, originates in the Jewish ghettos of Rome, is unique in that the artichokes are literally smashed with the side of a sturdy knife or the bottom of a heavy pan. The dish uses baby artichokes. Before crushing the artichokes, they must first be trimmed to remove the exterior leaves. The tops of the tender leaves that remain are also... read more

ChefTalk.com › Articles