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699 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

My Evening With Durangojo

My husband and I took off on a month long car trip to celebrate our benchmark wedding anniversary.  As we were driving back home, both of us commented on how much we enjoyed ending our adventure with Durangojo, also known as Joey.  It was the perfect way to round out our month. We like Durango Colorado very much; we’ve been here a few times now, but this visit was something special.  First off, there was the hair-raising experience just to get there. We came in from Cheyenne Wyoming, through Wolf Creek Pass, over the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains.  Wouldn’t... read more

French Toast For Two Please

by: Chef Jim Berman     The sweet, syrupy smell of falling aspen leaves, barely crinkling under your feet. Overly juicy, ripe-right-now Fuji apples exploding all over your chin. The wash of tingling of somebody saying "I really like you" for the first time. The closet-fresh, just-risen-from-summer-hibernation comfort of your favorite sweatshirt with the threadbare sleeves and stretched head opening. Coffee with a splash of hazelnut liqueur topped with way too rich whipped cream. Two slices of squishy-in-the middle, gently tanned French toast with each little pocket... read more

Cooking For Your Best Friend

By Pam Grant      As professional and non-professional cooks, we all have one thing in common here in our Cheftalk community, we love to cook, or at the very least talk about cooking. Ok some of us just like to eat, but no matter the severity we are all tied together somehow by food. I would be willing to wager that many of us have another love in our lives besides food. The one thing that keeps you warm at night, greets you warmly when you come home at the end of the day, and waits anxiously to see what wonderful culinary masterpiece you will bestow upon them each... read more

The Design and Plan of Great Vegetarian Menus

I'm a relatively simple enough person. I started cooking in 1966, when I was 4 years old. My first dish was a classic fried egg sammie, made in a skillet. It was the kind where you cut out a hole in the center of a slice of toasted bakery bread and drop in an egg,. You fry it up nice and give it a flip. Flip it back to a plate and you're good to go. Anyway, I've been cooking for a long time. When I was in cooking school, the CIA as it was, I learned some very important but not necessarily intentional lessons. One of those lessons was that that there is a very large... read more

Enduring Olives

The olive is a truly amazing food; there's no question about it. The age, history and uses of this fruit are so magnificent they almost seem inconceivable and made-up, like a myth. It's been around forever, well almost-olive oil and its seemingly miraculous qualities have been appreciated since the birth of western civilization, especially in the countries surrounding the Mediterranean. Cultivation of the olive tree is said to have started more than 5000 years ago and it was an olive leaf that a dove brought to Noah, indicating there was dry land ahead. What's even more... read more

History Of The Toast

One may find this hard to believe, but humans have been toasting things since the beginning of time. Man discovered early on that the only way to separate the edible part of the grain from the husks was to toast it. Deliberate toasting of the grain would make it digestible and improve its taste considerably. The early oven resembled today's seashore clambake; a pit was dug, lined with flat stone, and a fire was set. Then the cinders were brushed from the rock, which left the pit very hot. The baker would lay the stalks of grain on the rocks and roast them until the grain... read more

Tomatoes

In 1893 the United States had a 10% tax on imported vegetables but not fruits.  John Nix paid his taxes on his tomatoes to a tax collector named Edward Hedden.  One day Nix came across the botanical definition of a fruit:  the organ that emanates from the ovary of the plant and contains the seeds.  Nix then sued Hedden for a refund of his taxes on the grounds that tomatoes are a fruit.  The case ended up before the Supreme Court who held that "the common language of the people" was to be followed rather than botanical definitions, and thus, the tomato was erroneously... read more

Time With The Kids Vs A Home Cooked Meal You Can Have Both

Believe it or not, today's mothers spend more hours focused on their children than the mothers of the 1960s did. While we like to hark back to the Leave It To Beaver halcyon days of mothers greeting kids after school with milk and cookies as an ideal for raising happy children, the reality, according to a University of Maryland study, actually looks better these days. Based on detailed time diaries kept by thousands of Americans, mothers in 1965 spent 10.2 hours a week focused on their children in activities such as reading with them, feeding them or playing games.... read more

Petit Mothais

The Loire River rises in the Massif Central from where it flows into the Atlantic Ocean. At some 629 miles long, it is the longest river in France. It flows first to the north, and then to the west. Soft plains spread around the Loire's giant curve in a region justly called the Garden of France. Then countryside is sprinkled with Renaissance castles and there is an abundance of wines and cheeses. It was in this region in the eighth century, that the Saracens were repelled at the city of Poitiers. The Saracens were originally Arabs, who for centuries had occupied much... read more

How To Make Bisque

by: Chef Jim Berman The seventeenth century was a turning point for soup. Bisque was no longer made entirely of pounded pigeon or boiled game and garnished with crayfish. In fact, the crayfish took center stage. And, not surprisingly, the color of this classic soup turned pink. To get it straight, a bisque is defined as a cream soup, usually seafood-based and, classically, thickened with rice. There. I said it. I acknowledge that there should be some type of crustacean swimming about and rice, in one form or another, holding the goods in place. However, like the laws... read more

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