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742 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

Drinking History-Fruit Shrubs

  • by PeteModerator

  A couple of weeks ago I posted about how we went grape picking and the numerous jars of jelly my wife made with them. I also mentioned that we had plenty of leftover grapes for pie making and for me to experiment with. For awhile now, I have had a renewed interest in making shrub, a classic colonial American drink with a long history. With all the extra grapes, now was the perfect time to experiment.   Shrubs can be categorized into alcoholic and non-alcoholic. The alcoholic versions are basically fruit and sugar infused brandy or rum. Nowadays, we would probably... read more

Tea 101: A Beginner's Guide Part I An Introduction to Tea

  • by PeteModerator

  If you had told me 1 ½ years ago that I would be writing a Beginner’s Guide to tea, I would have laughed.  To me, tea wasn’t a “thing.”  Sure I drank it when I went to Chinese or Japanese restaurants, or I’d brew up a fruity, herbal tea when I wasn’t feeling well during the long, cold winter months, and of course, during summer there is always a pitcher of iced tea in the fridge, but that was about the extent of tea in my life.  Then one day I wandered into a tea shop in the mall.  There, on the back wall, were tin after tin of loose leaf teas with names such as... read more

Review Tutorial

Learn: How To Write A Review How To Edit A Review What Makes A Great Review? Can I Review My Own Products or Business I Am Connected To?     How To Write A Review Navigate to the page of the item you would like to review. Click "Write a Review"  There is a link near the top for this, or a button under the user reviews. The review creator has a few different fields.  In order to submit your review, you MUST fill in a Review Title, an Overall star rating, and a Full Review.  You are more than welcome to add Pros, Cons, other star... read more

Buttermilk A Recipes Homely Child

Only a mother would see her homely child as beautiful and only a devotee could love a glass of buttermilk. Thick and lumpy often with bits of butter, it oozes down the sides of an empty glass leaving a grainy film behind. But don't go screaming off into the night. There's more to this homely child than meets the eye. Lurking beneath the blemishes of what most believe to be the dairy family's black sheep is a vibrant, nutritious, and superb flavoring agent. There is no doubt that its name is disarming. In the early days, buttermilk was the milky liquid left from... read more

Chicken Salad - A Lesson in Presentation

  • by PeteModerator

  One of the most important lessons I learned as a young, professional chef was that presentation is everything. Even in the finest of restaurants you can serve the most mundane of foods if you create a spectacular, or beautiful, way to present it. Soups were a classic example of this. Many of the soups we made, at some of the best restaurants, I worked at, in Chicago, Atlanta and New Orleans, were soups that people make at home every day. The only difference was in the presentation. Vegetables were not roughly chopped, but meticulously cut into perfect little cubes.... read more

Peanut Butter Banana Pie with Pretzel Crust

  • by PeteModerator

  This past weekend I celebrated my 40th birthday. I wasn’t nearly as traumatic as I thought it would be. Sure, I’ve come to the realization that I’m not as young as I used to be, but I also came to the realization that you are only as old as you feel. I certainly don’t act and feel like I thought 40 year olds act and felt, when I was a teenager.   The weekend was rather low key. No major party, just good times with family. My parents made the trip up from Indiana and my brother and his wife came up from Madison, WI to help me celebrate, and to have our family... read more

Tea 101: A Beginner's Guide Part II The Basics

  • by PeteModerator

  In Part I of this series I introduced you to the world of tea.  In this part we will explore the basics of tea; purchasing, storing and brewing.  Of these topics, brewing is the most complex, and this is where many opinions can be found, many of which claim that they are the best, or only way to brew proper cups of tea.  I try to not get too caught up in the minutiae as, to me, brewing and drinking tea should relaxing endeavor, but there are certain guidelines regarding steeping times and temperatures that do need to be followed in order to brew a good cup of... read more

Preserving A Hot Trend

A classic way to enjoy figs is as preserves, and chefs throughout coastal South Carolina make them since the area has a prime climate for bumper fig crops. They start turning ripe in July, and the crop continues through August. Pastry Chef Tina Spaltro of the Marina Inn at Grande Dunes in Myrtle Beach, with encouragement from Executive Chef James Clark, figured out how to turn a lot of figs into delicious batch of sweetness. Making the preserves during the late summer of 2009, she says, was a spur-of-the-moment project that turned out well. "It was just a... read more

History And Descriptions Of Chilies

  • by PeteModerator

Written By Chef Peter Martin Sweet Heat It all starts with a slight tingling in the mouth that quickly turns into a light burning sensation.  Your nose starts to run and perspiration beads on your forehead as your eyes turn blurry with tears.  By now your mouth has become a raging river of molten lava, or so it seems.  You have just swallowed a powerful alkaloid that has caused your brain to release neurotransmitters telling your body you are in big trouble.  So who is this insidious poisoner so intent on seeing you suffer?  You are, and mostly likely you will attempt... read more

Soup Pasta Fagioli

Pasta Fagioli   Cranberry beans (borlotti beans) - cleaned and soaked over night    (or two cans rinsed cannellini beans)   4oz thick cut pancetta diced medium and browned in pan with olive oil   Add 1 chopped onion and 1 chopped celery, cook until softened   add couple of garlic cloves sliced fine, 2 tbl oregano, red pepper flakes and some anchovies (or a bit of paste), cook.   if I'm using canned beans I'll sometimes add some ground beef that was cooked/drained in a separate skillet at this stage.  (The real beans, that have soaked overnight, really seem to stand up... read more

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