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492 article submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

Discovering The Deli How To Make Corned Beef

Discovering the Deli: Corned Beef     Some time ago, I decided my long-term goal would be to open my deli. I grew up on deli food and miss it so - the soft, seeded-rye; stinky chopped chicken livers; the dew on the windows from the corned beefs… corning; the grease-glazed knishes; mountains of yellow potato salad. Delaware is not a haven for such gastronomical delights beyond chicken ‘n dumplings and steamed crabs. My very indiscriminate love of good food was born of my experience with really good deli food. So, in seven years, I want to open a deli. I have... read more

Introduction To The Anti Griddle

  Session One: Temper Temper   Written and Performed by Michele E Brown, CB Photographs by Cari Avit, Collin College            This beautiful PolyScience® Anti-Griddle was delivered in a big brown box. No special assembly required; no Swedish-to-English assembly  instructions with bags of screws and one-time use tools. Just the Anti-Griddle and its protective cover.   No-nonsense yet elegant, the Anti-Griddle looks like a box with air vents. There are no intimidating or fussy controls. The operating manual, too, is straight forward: lightly... read more

The 5 Facets of a Good Restaurant

        The 5 Facets of A Good Restaurant Jim Berman   A good restaurant is not just about the food. It is about the experience. The experience is about service, the surroundings, the food and a bit of the colorful panache that gets served with each dish. And a bit about the way a titillating dining experience makes you feel after you leave.   1. Do I want to go in there? The cut-out, strip-malled, fake stucco and neon green trim is no more inviting than going to the proctologist with your girlfriend. The McRestaurant landscape is plum-full of... read more

Santoku

The Japanese term santoku [三得] means “three virtues,” which has a distinct Buddhist connotation. Somewhere around 1920 or so, this term was applied to a hybrid Western-style knife, manufactured in Japan and constructed with the modern Japanese housewife in mind. Far more recently, the term has come to refer to an approximate blade shape that has gained a large market-share in Western, perhaps especially American, home kitchens. Despite the hype and advertising schemes applied, the knife in question is in no reasonable sense traditional to Japan. No clear figures are... read more

Making Sense Of Food Thickeners Part I

  • by PeteModerator

How Do I Thicken My Soup?We rarely think when it comes to thickening soups and sauces.  We usually just reach for that box of cornstarch are whip up a quick batch of roux, never really thinking of what we are doing.  But do you really understand when to use one thickening agent over another?  Why do most gravies use flour or a roux and why do many fruit desserts use cornstarch, arrowroot or tapioca?  In part I of this series we will examine the myriad of varieties of thickeners out there and when you should use each.  In part II we will focus completely on the use of... read more

Steak Cooking 101 (home/indoor) by a Pro

  Just thought for my first major subject post I'd talk about something we would do in the fine dining restaurants I worked in over the years. The number one question I would be asked time and time again is how to cook a proper 5 star dining experience steak. So I guess I should share it (though I am sure many people know how it is done and has been discussed here, perhaps my take will revive the style).   First of all the cut: Look... there are a lot of cuts from NY Strip, Rib Eye, filet, and so on. But for all intents and purposes lets go with a standard BONE-IN... read more

A Guide To Substitutions For Herbs And Spices

  • by PeteModerator

Written By Chef Peter Martin As foodies, we are very lucky that we live in today's world.  Never in the history of mankind have we had access to so many foods and cuisines.  It's not uncommon to eat Chinese food one night, Italian the next, and Mexican the following night.  Even in the smallest of towns you can find at least 1 or 2 of these more common ethnic cuisines.  In major metropolitan areas, the choices are even vaster, with choices ranging from Thai, Ethiopian and Peruvian to Russian, Japanese, and all manner of European cuisines.  Grocery stores have even... read more

How To Roast A Chicken And Other Savory Foods

To look in any dictionary under the word "roast" will most likely yield a definition such as "to cook foods using dry heat in a contained oven or near an open flame". Sounds simple, right? As with anything though, a roast can be made as uncomplicated or elaborate as one decides. I personally like to keep things simple. Once, while taking a course on French Cuisine at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, I witnessed a chef roasting three capon. As simple as it sounds it was one of the most beautiful yet laborious roasts I had ever seen. First he slid the thinnest slivers of black... read more

Myths About Olive Oil

All extra-virgin olive oils are basically the same. Just because the bottle reads "extra virgin" does not mean that the oil is made from quality olives, or that the olives used weren't bruised, oxidized, olive fly-infested, or overripe. In fact, it is possible for an olive oil to be made from low quality olives but still achieve the "extra virgin" requirements through chemical processing. However, these oils will always be found out by their oily, fatty, bruised apple-like taste and their processed aroma. Every single one of Lucini's olives is hand-picked and pressed... read more

Mexican Food Recipes Champurrado

With late winter storms postponing spring indefinitely, the allure of the common cup of cocoa is certain to wear thin. So now is the perfect time to try and make something new, like a cup of the traditional Mexican hot chocolate drink, champurrado. Champurrado is a rich and decadent hot chocolate drink, spiced with cinnamon and anise. It also distinguishes itself from its American counterparts by being thickened with masa, then whipped, into a frothy, fluffy cup of goodness. When prepared properly, champurrado is not unlike a traditional cup of cappuccino—espresso... read more

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