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44 how to submissions by the ChefTalk.com community.

Meyer Lemon Curd

In years gone by, I use to watch Martha Stewart television programs, but, well things happened. In one particular episode, Martha made Lemon Curd and I thought, someday I’ll make that recipe, my way. I love the sweet-tart-tang of Meyer Lemons, so here’s my rendition.   Meyer Lemon Curd   6 Meyer Lemons, juiced (approx. 1 C of juice) 2 C granulated Sugar 12 Eggs Yolks (save those whites for frosting a cake maybe) 2 Sticks or 1 C butter, diced Zest from the 6 Meyer Lemons   In a metal or glass bowl (heat-proof), whisk the egg yolks and sugar. Place the bowl over... read more

Making Creme Brulee

  • by PeteModerator

  I've never understood analogies that compare vanilla to something plain and simple.  Vanilla is exotic, spicy, floral, and comforting and in no way simple, plain or boring.  Sure, it gets used in just about every baked dessert, but just because it's use is widespread doesn't make plain or simple.  Vanilla is the second most expensive spice in the world, after saffron. This is because growing, harvesting and getting vanilla to market is a time-consuming, labor intensive undertaking.  First off, the orchids, that vanilla comes from must be hand pollinated.  The pod... read more

Orange Sherbet

Orange Sherbet The ninth in a series on ice creams, custards and sorbets Jim Berman CCI     Just in time for those fun holiday party punch bowls, I offer you orange sherbet. Yes, that bobbing mass of Titanic-sinking glacial mass of sweetened ice creamy goodness swimming in the overly-sweet, fruit juice and 7-up concoction that makes its way, front and center, to office parties, church bazars and uncomfortable family gatherings. Mispronounced as sher’bert, sherbet is a lower-fat version of the ice cream that we relish in the warm summer months (or on the occasional... read more

The First Timer's Guide to Roasting a Turkey

  • by PeteModerator

You're finished with school, have moved out of your parents house and have your very first apartment.  You're feeling good about things and decide it's time to take that next great step to becoming a "real" adult.  You invite your parents over for Thanksgiving Dinner.  It sounded like such a great idea 3 weeks ago, but now, with Turkey Day fast approaching, the panic has set in.  "What were you thinking," you ask yourself.  "I can barely make a Grilled Cheese or heat up a can of soup without burning it.  However am I going to roast a turkey and get everything else... read more

Making Sauerkraut

  • by PeteModerator

  Sauerkraut, it's one of those foods that you either love or hate, at least from my experience.  I've never met anyone that has a lukewarm opinion about it.  It's one of those foods that always seems to illicit a strong response.  I happen to fall into that category of those that love the stuff.  While I've always liked sauerkraut, at least as far back as I can remember, it wasn't until I learned to make my own that I came to truly love this German staple.   Here, in Wisconsin, making sauerkraut has been an autumn tradition for generations, with families often... read more

Not Your Mother's Creamed Corn

  • by PeteModerator

Not Your Mother's Creamed Corn The second in a series examining the foods of the New World and its vast influence on cuisines around the globe.   By Peter Martin   Today corn is the world's largest grain crop, by weight, with over 815 million tons harvested in 2009.  This surpasses both rice and wheat, corn's biggest rivals by over 100 million tons each.  While the top 3 producers of corn are the US, China, and Brazil, every continent has a representative in the Top 10 producers of corn.  Yet, 500 years ago this important grain was unknown outside of North America. ... read more

Cherry Ice Cream

Frozen Summer: Cherry Ice Cream The eighth in a series on ice creams, custards and sorbets Jim Berman CCI       My homage, if you will, to the Prunus Avium, that dangling orb of summer lovin’ comes in the form of delicious cherries hugged and squeezed and nestled in a lovely frozen amalgam of cream, milk and sugar. You see, I owe much of my interest in cooking to my mother’s aggressive avoidance of the kitchen and all it represents. There were to be no dirty dishes, hence we used paper plates almost exclusively. There were to be no spots upon the stove,... read more

Pesto v3.0

Pesto v3.0 Jim Berman CCI   Back in February, 2010, I came out with a couple of pieces on Pesto, that beloved amalgam of green, summer goodness. Since then, through many iterations, revisions and interpretations, I have changed my ways. Below is the original recipe, with a few changes in latitude and longitude. And there are some pictures thrown in, as well. My reflections are duly noted will make for more fodder when I circle back after even more recapitulations. No verbose history, origins of the ingredients and the like. Rather, a head-on recipe that works... read more

Tomato Concasse - How to Peel and Seed a Tomato

  • by PeteModerator

Tomato Concasse - How to Peel and Seed a Tomato The first in a series examining the foods of the New World and its vast influence on cuisines around the globe.   by Peter Martin   "In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue..." and the culinary world was forever changed.  It's hard to imagine Italian cuisine without tomatoes, Indian and Thai food without the kick of chile peppers, or the numerous cuisines that rely heavily on the potato, but before Columbus's voyage the rest of the world, except for the Americas, did without these foods and many, many more.  This... read more

Teri-Spam Musubi (moo-sue-bee)

    5 ½ - 6 cups cooked medium grain white Rice 1 can Spam, sliced equally into 8 pieces 2 sheets of Musubi Nori Sauce: ¼ cup Brown Sugar ½ cup Soy Sauce 1 Garlic clove, smashed   Steam the rice and allow to cool down enough to handle, but still warm.  In a small bowl, combine the sauce ingredients until the sugar dissolves, set aside.    In a dry skillet, brown the Spam well; set aside.  Wipe out the pan, add in the sauce and bring to a bubble; add back in the spam, turning occasionally, cook until the sauce thickens.    Time... read more

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