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Posts by ricwhiting

Hi Panini,   I was using a Kitchenaid 5 qt mixer, but now I hand knead all my bread. Just to refresh your memory, I use a Poolish 100 gm Bread Flour, !00 gram water and a tiny, tiny amount of instant yeast. (1/4 cup water mixed with 1/8 tsp of instant yeast. I stir well and use ONLY 2 tsp of the yeasted water) this is less than 1/32nd of a tsp of yeast granules. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and let sit on counter  ; It takes about 14 hrs to ripen and double in volume....
I often watch Jeffery Hammelman´s videos on making baguettes. If you are not familiar with Mr. Hammelman, he is the head baker at King Arthur flour. He has a large tub of fermented dough which he dumps out onto his work counter. If you watch him you will notice that he does not do any "punch-down" He moves directly to scaling and preshaping the baguette dough. I´m sure that he feels that the preshaping and the following shaping expels plenty of gas. Last night I tried to...
Hello Panini,   Thank you very much for your support and comments.  Interesting thing about my attitude regarding baguette dough is that I have failed so much and I´ve read , and read and read then I get confused because one author says, "Do it this way" ; the next bread book author says something entirely different.  Example, regarding french bread hydration. One says 72 % hydration or higher. The next says 65 % is fine. That´s a pretty big difference. Last night I doublé...
Thank you all for the gemerous replies.  OK, I´m convinced, from now on bread flour only in my baguette dough. I´m also convinced that I´m dealing with multiple problem areas. Wrong flour (no matter what the bread book author states ). Also, re dough temp: interesting concept. colder temp (65 F ) kills off some yeast and allowing CO2 to grow out of proportation. I´ll certainly give this area some trials. Though, to be honest, I lived in the tropics for 7 years and I had...
I don´t wish to be argumenative but many formulas in my baking books as cited above call for A.P. flour.  That said. I have used bread flour to make these loaves and the problem remains. Additionally, it is my understanding that the whole purpose of making baguette or french bread dough is to get a very open crumb. Once again, the above listed authors call for a very gentle handling of the dough once it has been bulk fermented so as too not destroy all of the tiny air...
I have been trying (failing) to make a decent French bread. I have followed formulas in Peter Reinhart, Rose Levy Beranbaum, and Daniel T. DiMuzio baking books.Dozens and dozens of times. But one thing that has me stumped is that I ALWAYS get gigantic bubbles in my fermented dough. When I dump out the dough onto the work counter and i start to shape the loaves , RIGHT THEN AT THAT PRECISE POINT I get giant bubbles in the dough. When I say giant, I mean huge, the size of...
Thank you all. With all of the helpful advice, I have enough ideas that I can use as tenderizers. the wine worked well and next time I think I'll use corn starch. Thanks again.
Thank you all for the wonderful advice. Last night I trimmed my beef, cut it into cubes, added 1/2 cup of red wine and marinated over-night in the frig. This afternoon, after a 14 hour marinate, I drained the beef, tossed the cubes with flour and quickly fried them, working with small batches, just until nicely browned. After that I added the beef stock.. After only one hour of simmering I was surprised at how very tender the beef was. But the taste was just a little bit...
I'm sure I didn't explain myself well enough. As I now live in Mexico, there is zero possibility that I could ever find a Jaccard, or,for that matter ANY brand name tenderizer. I am going to have to make due with basic natural foods. Also, it is important that WHATEVER I use as a tenderizer it should have a very mild,if any, flavor. So, vinegar and/or lemon juice are out.
Hello All,  I have moved from the U.S. to a country that does not have quality beef. I need help finding a way to tenderize the beef. I know, of course, that I can pound the beef with the spiked end of a mallet. This works ok for swiss steak etc. But if, for example, I wanted to make beef stew or Hungarian goulash what else might I do. Back home I would use  chuck (nice and moist) but I have no idea what the locals call chuck. Also, I'd much prefer NOT to use any...
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