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Posts by ricwhiting

I have baked a number of cheesecakes and, at least in my opinion, the graham cracker bottom is supposed to be damp. BUT if you mean soggy then I suggest that you wrap your spring-form pan EXCEEDINGLY CAREFULLY and that you make sure that no water can possibly get in over the top. Also, please don't try to use 2 pieces of foil in order to make a larger piece. It can't work. The water POSITIVELY will find a way through. Good luck
Perhaps I misled folks. I am interested in lactic acid not acetic acid. Unless I'm mistaken yogurt and sour cream both have high concentrations of the latter. What I want is the mild flavor that lactic acid produces for a laof I'm currently working on.
Hello All, I am interested in getting your thoughts on developing a maximum amount of lactic acid in my pre'ferment. Recipe, 1/4 cup water mixed with 1/8 tsp dry yeast, set aside.                                     65 gm. A.P. flour                                     10 gm W.W. flour                                      60 gm water                                      1 Tblsp of the yeasted water Beat well by hand for 2 min, cover and let rest at room temp...
Another factor that I have tried is reducing the HEIGHT of the meringue as I spoon it onto the pie. Unstead of trying to get a super high mound I reduced that height to about 2'. My thinking is that that will allow the meringue  to cook all the way through and hence weep less. That, plus the other factors listed above seems to be working even on the most humid, even rainy, days.
Your idea about condensation is an interesting thought that I have not come accross before. Not sure how I can prevent that but I will mull it over. To a large extent I have been following all the tips on meringue in Shirley Corriher's book BakeWise. She also talks about an Italian meringue where hot syrup is poured into the egg whites at the soft peak stage. I have not yet tried it as I'm still working my way through her other meringues. She says that if I put the...
I have been attempting to make a truly weep-proof meringue for pies and I have had some limited success but I need some guidence.  To make the meringue I use 3 egg white(with-out a hint of yolk), 3/8 tsp cream of tartar and 6 Tblsp sugar. I have tried doing the meringue by combining the egg whites and cr of tartar, beating to soft peak stage then gradually adding the sugar until stiff peaks, then spooning it onto a hot filling and baking. Seldom really worked. I next...
I know this may sound like a pretty strange question but, here it goes. I am a retiree living in the Philippines and cooking is my life. Until recently I have been able to obtain a browning and flavoring sauce known as "Kitchen Bouquet". For the last 50 years I have been using Kitchen Bouquet in sauces, gravys, soups, etc. Unfortunately, the importer stopped supplying it. I tried going on the internet and I found some "recipes" for Kitchen Bouquet but when I tried them...
I surprised that no-one has mentioned the fact that the cut fries (russets only please) need to be soaked in ice water for at least 1/2 hr., then dried before frying at 280 degrees for about 3 minutes. The time can not be more accurate than this because of the variables of: fry thickness and size of fryer. Following the 1st cooking, the fries will be white and extremely limp. After cooling on a drip screen, the fries are then cooked a 2nd. time at 375 degrees. It should...
I am over-seas and I want to make my own corned beef. The problem is that I no longer have access to the "cure" that I used back home. Please don't give me a brand name to use because they woun't have it here. What I need is the name of the chemical that both cures the meat and keeps it red during cooking. Also, the amount needed to cure the meat would be helpful. Thanks
I live over-seas and need a good way to make flour tortillas from scratch. Please note: I do not need a recipe USING flour tortillas. I need a recipe for making flour tortillas. Thanks for your help.
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