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Posts by rjx

Yes, 27 is not too old. My Chef was in school in his early 30's. Me too.Go to restaurants you are interested in and offer to work for free so you can get experience. That's really what it takes to get into the kitchen with no experience. That's what it took for me, and my Chef said he worked in a restaurant for 3 months with no pay while he worked another job.I would hold off on school until you get a real taste of what it is like working in a restaurant kitchen during a...
I think college is what RAS1187 was talking about Here are a few baking/pastry schools I know about: Notter School of Pastry Arts Notter School of Pastry Arts in Orlando, FL | Pastry Courses taught by Internationally Renowned Professionals San Francisco Baking Institute San Francisco Baking Institute | Pastry Chef | Baking School | Pastry School | Bread | Pastry | Education |
By what you mentioned, you and I are almost identical! I think the best thing you can do is go to the type of restaurants you would like to work at and plead your case to the chef. Offer to work for free. Also, put ads out online that you are after experience in a kitchen. Ask your school instructors for advice, maybe they know someone. Whatever you do, don't give up. Everything you mentioned tells me that you will find something beneficial sooner, rather than...
You will not learn how to be a chef at any school. It takes years of dedication while in a professional kitchen. Learning as much as you can through repetition from doing the same things everyday and learning from daily issues that might rise. As a chef you need to be a leader, a manager, and teacher. Find out which books will be used at your school. Buy them ASAP and try to learn as much from them BEFORE you need to read them in class. Read the following books...
It's ruff. You might have to sacrifice sleep and / or free time to work for free in the kitchen, and then work a paying shift at a regular job either before, or after your kitchen shift. And the days off from the kitchen (if any) could be the time to work at a paying job. You could keep / or get a regular paying job now, and focus the rest of your attention to school, and try to make the best of it. Volunteer for all the events you can, and try learn as much as you can....
I will talk about my current experience. I had put many ads online to work for free, scrubbing dishes, floors, whatever it took to get myself into a professional kitchen. I posted mostly on craigslist, and a few hospitality sites. And I answered many ads with hardly any response. I actually received a few work for free offers, but unfortunately they were very far from where I live. Finally, about a month ago, I received an email from an owner of an upscale restaurant...
And how in depth they can be. ;) matthewy Try finding a job at the type of restaurant you would like to work in. Go in between lunch and dinner. Ask to speak to the chef and mention that you are thinking of attending a culinary school to pursue a career in cooking. Offer to work for free. See if the chef will offer some kind of learn as you go thing. Work in the industry to see if you like it before paying for an expensive school.
Good luck, you are going to need it! Since you are taking over an established restaurant, are you keeping the menu and recipes that made it what it is? Or are you changing the menu? If the menu stays the same, the new chef might not get the old recipes to taste as good as the previous chef. If you change the established formula, it could cause loyal customers to stop frequenting the restaurant. And so on... I don't think a fancy school is all that important. A nice...
I would try to stay away from chains that reheat most of their food. But if a chain is all you can get, it's better than nothing. Personally, I would rather work at a sub-par restaurant that makes food from the ground up than any chain restaurant. Go to the sub-par fine dinning restaurants and meet with the chef and plead your case to them. Offer to work for free. Mention you are after experience. If you show passion and determination, it might work out. It did for me.
Yes. It's for my manager function in my quantities class. Butternut squash soup, 88 servings. And I can't put 33 cups of squash on the order form.
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