or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by web monkey

  I knew that someday, all those years of driving around in a service truck would pay off! 8-) Thanks!  It's a real complement coming from a pro!Luckily, it takes a couple of days to make the dough and prep everything. If I could do it in a couple of hours, I'd look like Jabba The Hut. 8-)Terry
I'm not a professional chef, but I make a ton of pizza, and used to service appliances, so I hope nobody jumps on me for posting here. I've never seen a really good pizza that didn't have a few bubbles, and popping them is a normal part of baking. On the other hand, you mentioned that you started having problems when you got your new oven.  Some ovens have a very wide temerature spread between where the heater comes on and then turns off (this is actually a thermostat...
Cool! You're very lucky!. I had a "sushi dry spell" for about a year, while I tried to locate a good fish supplier after sushifoods closed.Terry
If this oven is as old as I think it is, the only icon it's ever seen was the little guy in the chef's hat, printed on the box it was shipped in, and the the clock has hands, not numbers. Terry
You might want to try sushi and sashimi. I'm much happier with raw or nearly raw fish than I am with most cooked fish. However I do freeze it first. The USDA recommends 7 days at -4°F to kill any parasites. What I actually do is fillet, portion and vacuum pack the pieces, then bury them in crushed dry ice until they're rock-hard, then toss them in the freezer for a week.With just a few exceptions, I've never had fish that tasted better cooked than it did when raw.If you...
If the red hand is in the middle of the clock face, it's probably a minute timer. if you turn it a little to the right it will probably buzz (where 12:01 would be on a regular clock). If it's just a timer (if it buzzes) it has nothing to do with your oven. The ovens that had a start/stop timer generally had three knobs. One for the clock, one for the start time and another for cook hours.If the pilot light is lit and you don't have any flames in the oven, your oven is...
I'm not your father, but I do have the advantage of having been where you are, and of watching all my friends make the choices you're facing.My suggestion would be to treat this job like a Gift From Heaven, even if it's months before you get any closer to the food than the trash can, sink and a scotch-brite pad. Stay there as long as they'll let you, and do whatever they ask and be the best "whatever" that ever walked the face of the earth. Everything else will follow in...
It depends on how well I know the restaurant. There are places I eat regularly, where if something was bad, the chef and owner would be mortified. Typically, they'll apologize, remake it and take it off the bill. Happily, this almost never happens at these places, since I'd feel terrible.If it's a place I've never been to before, I'll mention it when I leave, just as a "head's up" but won't eat anything else from the kitchen that day. If they take it off my bill, I'll stop...
Because:You're incredibly lucky to have landed a job in a kitchen run by an apparently successful chef. I know people two and three (and four and five) times older than you that never had that opportunity. If you stay in cooking, that's great. If you don't that's fine too, but wherever you go, if you get the chance to work under someone who is truly great in their field, it will change your life forever, and in all cases, the golden rule is to "be reliable, be on time, be...
This: http://www.edgeproinc.com/ puts a 15° single bevel edge on my Global sashimi knife, as well as 15° and 20° double-bevel edges on my chef's knives and cleavers.Note that unlike most of the others I've seen, this jig actually only maintains the angle of the sharpening stones. The knife is completely free to move, so you can sharpen any size blade.That said, I've watched the sushi chef at a local place sharpen his with nothing more than a couple of stones and a tub of...
New Posts  All Forums: