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Posts by KYHeirloomer

A lot of northern african recipe will typically specify: use fake-saffron or turmeric "for color" AND use some real saffron for flavor. I sometimes do that.    You know, I've heard several TV chefs give that sort of advice, but have never actually seen it phrased that way in a North African recipe.   My attitude is, if I'm using real saffron anyway, it will provide the color, and may as well use enough to provide the distinct flavor as well. And at Saffron.Com's...
   simply buy a small amount at a grocery store   Yeah, you could do that. But it's an incredibly expensive way to go. Last time I looked, a couple of years ago, one of those little tubes, coming in at something like .1 grams, was $12. That translates at $342/ounce. And it wasn't very good saffron at that, having a large proportion of yellow tendrils.   If you want to learn more than you ever cared to about saffron, check out http://www.saffron.com/. And,...
All the product they used was checked by a health inspector and what ever didn't pass wasn't allowed to be used   Oh, yeah. That's realistic. Next time I feel like dumpster diving for scraps I'll be sure and carry a health inspector along for the ride.   You really see that as responsible programming?
Everyone has to make their own decisions, MrMexico.   Yeah, it's expensive. But do you know how much, volume wise, an ounce of saffron is? It almost fills a round can 6 1/2 inches in diamter by 1 1/2 inches deep.   When it's truly called for, nothing else substitutes.   You might enter saffron in the seach box, too. We've had several discussions about its use and availability, and you might gain insights from them.
Also tajines, where it's almost de rigeur. It's also commonly used in Mideastern and Indian cookery.   Saffron does have a unique flavor. But, frankly, in the amounts it's often used, it provides more color than taste. And if all you're looking for is the color, tumeric does the same job.
Well, then, FF, the pit is the easy part. All it takes is a spade. Or, if your ground is very rocky, perhaps a pickaxe.   For most people the inclination is to build a round firepit. That's ok for a social fire, and for cooking hot dogs and marshmallows on sticks. But it's not the most efficient shape for a cooking fire. For that a rectangle makes more sense.   FWIW, here's a description of mine. Just adapt it as necessary.   The pit, itself, is roughly five...
Wouldn't it be neat to go back in time and taste an authentic meal from the past!   No need to go back in time, Jenniflop. Food historians and historic reenactors prepare such meals all the time.   I happen to specialize in 18th century North American colonial foods, for instance. But you can go back all the way to the Romans if you want, because the food data is available.
ky, point taken   My work is done.
That softness, FF, comes from the poaching. Chilling is then needed to firm it up. However, if you wrapped the bacon, then tied the bundle, it sears quite well.   The major objection to tying is, as Phil pointed out, the fact that you get the groves from the string, which some people find objectionable. On the upside, on larger cuts, such as a stuffed pork loin or flank steak, the string not only holds everything together, it can be used to mark the cut...
There's no reason, FF, that you can't use wood in any charcoal grill.   I run into this all the time, with folks who want information about building a cooking firepit (as opposed to a social one) in their yards. And I always wonder why? It's a lot easier to cook standing up in front of a grill then it is kneeling on your knees.   Don't get me wrong. If somebody want to pay me a consulting fee, I'll be out in their yard with a shovel. I just don't understand why...
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