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Posts by KYHeirloomer

I wonder how you define unusual, in this context. So much of it has to do with the cuisines you're used to cooking, and the herbs you consider common.   For instance, I was really surprised, recently, to discover how few people are familiar with savory. For me it's an everyday herb. Most people do not consider lavender as a culinary herb. But in the south of France it's fairly common. Among all the things I grow in the culinary herb bed at Fort Boonesborough, the one...
just really like the  ingredients in Cumberland sauce.   What's not to like? But, as always, you have to look for a balance of flavors. And this one just works best with stronger tasting birds.   But to make up for it, here's a really nice recipe for partridge:   Peter's Partridge   1 partridge Butter Salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 large bunch seedless white grapes 1 jigger brandy 1 pint heavy cream   Melt butter in a skillet and brown...
Margcata, I would go easy using Cumberland Sauce on upland birds. They tend to be delicate, and the sauce might overpower their flavor.   I can see it with woodcock, though, which are strong enough to stand up to the sauce. And perhaps guinea fowl if you stick with older birds. It's really better with waterfowl overall.      
Everything Koukouvagia said, with one additional thought: Boarding School Chef, to me, connotes being the chef at a boarding school; sort of the opposite of who you are.   As to creating recipes: Go for it. Take a basic recipe you have and ask yourself "what if." Try, based on your level of experience, to predict what the changes will do. Once you're confident doing that, start from scratch. Take, say, a chicken, and again ask yourself "what if." What if I roast it...
San Marzano tomatoes from Italy are better -- as good as you can get.   What, exactly, makes them better, BDL? Taste? Texture? Proportion of pulp to sees & cores?   Or merely the fact that they're faddish?   According to the Consorzio San Marzano (which is the San Marzano Tomato Consotium), at least 95% of tomatoes sold in America that are identified as being San Marzano, aren't. So, have you been reacting to the taste and texture of what's in that can? Or...
Kind of interesting that the Grillworks carries such a hefty pricetag, while Argentinian types are much cheaper. Brick-enclosed and with covers they go for from, roughly, 700 bucks to around 2,000. Go figure.   I taped the episode, and will review it. But I don't think the one he used looks like the model you linked to.   Me, what I'm mostly interested in is the V shaped grate rods and drip pan, to reduce or eliminate flare-ups.
Another blast from the past. This thead is ten years old.   I used to have one of those baskets. After frustrating myself with it for years I finally deep sixed it. The thing never worked, no matter what I did to the spuds.   Recently I saw a celebrity chef (forget which one at the moment) who made the baskets using two ladles. I would have thought this unsuitable, cuz the potatoes aren't actually surrounded by the hot oil. But they seemed to come out...
Was watching an episode of Bobby Flay's Barbecue Addict and he used an interesting grill.   Although he referred to it as a parrila, it lacked most of the fancy bells and whistles found on the Argentinian versions. This appeared to be a rectangular firebox with the V-shaped grate rods of a parilla.   Anybody know where something like that is available?
BTW, GarretJames, we've had several discussion about game cooking in the past. You might want to try the search engine to find some of them.   This one, I think, is particularly pertinent: http://www.cheftalk.com/t/954/i-have-two-goose-breasts-any-ideas
 I love Cumberland Sauce with goose.   Don't we all, ChefRoss! I provided that recipe both because it's delicious, and simple enough for someone like the OP to prepare. When making it myself, btw, I add some Grand Marnier to the sauce.   When I was more active as an outdoor writer we just about lived on game and self-harvested fish & seafood. By boys were in their teens, in fact, before they knew what beef and chicken tasted like. And they were disappointed with...
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