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Posts by Breton Beats

It has been a long time since I have made raviolis, and feeling a little rusty. I will be making 25 large (single serving) raviolis. Since I now run a bakery I assume my best bet is to use the sheeter (butterfly model). Any recommendations, as in what number do I take it down to? I will be making handkerchief pasta for big, single serving raviolis. Thanks for any thoughts. P.S. If you have a killer recipe for shrimp or seafood filling I love to hear it.
I worked for almost 7 years as a private yacht chef. Sometimes on charter yachts (VERY busy) and sometimes on private yachts (not so busy). I loved it, made VERY good money and had a blast as yacht crew do like to party. In the beginning I worked on sail boats and traveled up and down the Med (from Spain to Scicily, Turkey and N. Africa) I also sailed across the Atlantic, then worked the Carribean from east to west (though some of that work was delivary). After a while I...
I have brined frozen turkeys, after they were thawed though. You don't want kosher, or seasoned ones as they are already brined. I find around T-Day smaller grocery stores, butcher stores, and co-ops will be advertising for fresh turkeys. If you don't already check out the Cooks Illustrated web site or books I find they are the best for explaining this to the home cook.
Yes you should use the coldest water possible for making stock for all the reason listed above, to drive out impurites, also to draw out the. But the reason many professional chefs add ice to the stock is maybe because that is what they learned in their restaurants. Many restaurants put their stocks on to cook very slowly overnight. The closing shift puts in on, and the opeing shift takes it off. All night it goes at very low heat. When you have stocks on for too long...
Your grandma's technique sounds a little bit like Beef Wellington. (minus the mushrooms and foi gras). Which is wrapped in puff pastry or pie crust. You could also check out salt crusts (you don't actually eat the salt).
It can have great flavor but in all instance I have made it it was simmered (not boiled) for about 30 minutes. First crack them up a bit and rinse in cold water if there is any gunk hanging on to it. Melt some butter in the bottom of your pan sautee the broken shells for a few minutes. Deglaze with wine add (as you want, you don't need it all, but include one acid) onion, parsley stems, thyme, white wine, lemon juice, COLD water, Bring to a boil then simmer for Ok...
Yes you can use it. On a professional level mangled dough or problem dough is usually made into flaky cinnamon rolls or something. But for home use of course it can shaped. Depending on why it seeped out you could end up with a shorter dough or melted butte oozing out when it is baked. You won't know until you try. Do you know why it seeped out? Do you mean it seeped out after you folded it from between the layers. This could simply be a lack of sealing the edges after...
Photographers are fond of saying it isn't the camera that takes good pictures it is the person holding the camera. The same can be said about opening a bakery. One only needs to walk through Paris, or old New York and look at the equipment they're using. Miracles can be worked with old and rusty equipment. I am not advocating that you shop for rusty junk but don't feel preasued to buy the newest shiniest, best. Sure RobotCoup is an awesome! food processor. But we've been...
Just to reassure.. of course I am not going to cook food in my home, why would I when I have a 2000sq commercial kitchen and a wholesale license. I am well versed in food safety and sanitation. Though 10 years of professional cooking is by no means a career, after fine dining restaurants, catering, internships in France, 5 years as private chef, and now a restaurant owner I have picked up few tips along the way. I am certified in my state to teach safety and sanitation and...
I fear this questions is going to come across a little strange or uh...duh.. but here it goes. Almost all of my cooking has been to order or served hot. Recently I have been getting into HMRs and personal cheffing by requests from customers. Soups, cassaroles, pasta, stews, etc.. I get. But some of my clients are requesting roasts. At home I cook meat in small batches to order, when I do do a larger roast I use the leftovers for sandwiches etc.. How exactly do you work...
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