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Posts by angrybob

Do Grantons or kullens make any real world difference when using a meat slicing knife for things like roasts or hams?  If in fact they do make a difference would the brand of knife make any difference?  I've seen the argument made that they shorten the usable life span of the knife, but and please correct me if I'm wrong, as I recall  on a Granton Brand knife the grantons go all the way to the edge, and does that  enhance it's performance?      
Thanks for the reply Potato42.   What I'm using for a slicer now is an old 8" Swibo bread knife I reground and sharpened to about 20 degrees.  I know a Forschner would be ok for my stated purpose, but a pointy type of slicer or suji might be useful (read fun) for some other purposes as well. I sometimes use that Swibo like other people would use a petty. Guess I should just make some calls to retailers and ask them about the Mu steel characteristics.  
I'm in the market for a moderately priced 10 " slicer that would mostly be used on corned beef or a pork shoulder a couple of times a week at most for home use.  I noticed that Messermeister's Asian Precision yanagiba and their Bamboo Mu line are available clearanced priced around $60.  Does anyone have any experience with either of these two?  I have also  been considering Forschner 12" ,or spending a bit more for Fujiwara 270 carbon or even  a carbon Sab.  Any input is...
Siduri, My suggestions were based on some recent experiences I've had.  We had been residing in a place for the past year without access to a stove so when we moved to our new house I didn't have my old trusty starter.  My old starter never gave me any problems.  I whipped up a new batch of home made in late January.  In my first few attempts I was getting some results similiar to yours and after a few experiments longer feeding and developement times for the starter...
Siduri,  How active is your starter?  When I've made a recipe similiar to what you are making I found that if I fed my starter a few more days than I thought was necessary , so it was quite active, produced more oven spring. Another thing you might want to try is a higher protein flour or adding vital wheat gluten, I do this when I make a rye to ensure I get a nice loaf.  I'm out of guesses. 
If your current saute pan meets all your needs and it's the type that the nonstick coating is applied over stainless steel, that coating can be removed. It does take a bit of work but if you like the pan it's an alternative. I found an All Clad nonstick 3 qt covered saute at the thrift store in for $8. The basic pan was in good condition so I used oven cleaner on the non stick interior and scrubbed it with sand. After I got most of it off I used finer and finer grades of...
The Vollrath Tribute pans seem to cook on par with the All Clad that we have, and both of those are a bit quicker than the one old Calphalon anodized aluminum. The Vollrath are heavier built, and for me , the handle is vastly superior, in comfort and having a more secure feel, than either of the other two. The pans we have are the plated steel handle, not the silicone covered. The finish of the Vollrath pans are a brushed not polished finish, which is nice because...
I have a couple of frying pans from the Vollrath Tribute line of triply. I have nothing but praise for the 10 inch pan and I really like the 12 inch, but it did warp in use. If you have a gas cooktop it wouldn't be much of an issue, nor do I believe it would be with a traditional coil element electric cook top, but I have a flat top and it is annoying and does cause two zone heating in the pan. The pans I have have the straight plated handle, not the silicone covered,...
I think it would certainly be worth a try. Thirty years ago when my wife, then girl friend, wanted to surpise me with a duck dinner things didn't go according to plan. This was only the second time she'd ever used an electric oven and didn't realise the main lower element had in fact, burned out early on in the process, roasting the duck by the heat of the anemic top element only. An approx 5 pound duck took about 4-4 1/2 hours to cook, but was succulant and had a...
Thank you for the response. Sharpening a bread knife once a year sounds pretty good to me. I have to attend to my Forschner more than that, but it is used a lot on very crusty bread.
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