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Posts by expertsharpener

phatch - you hit the nail on the head - however, that particular blade is the one that was under discussion so thats what I refered to. As matter of fact I dont know a single chef that uses anything other than a conventional knife - whatever their favourite one happens to be to chop herbs. I only even seen a mezzaluna being used by very few Italian chefs. But when you introduce a range it is aimed not only at the professional but equally to a domestic market, where you...
hotchef of course you correct - but it does also depend on which chinese cleaver you are refering to - as rule the most commonly used one in my experience is the No 2which as you point out is thin and light but my point was not the weight it was about the shape and there is no denying that the Chinese cleavers are a broad blade - in western use and commonly everywwhere else reserved for vegetables or chopping - i mean its exact opposite of a western boning knife which is...
Hotchef I agree with you - its not fundamentally new - but then I am sure you appreciate that even the most minute improvement on a elemental design is a huge step forward - I mean the knife in its basic design has been with man for almost 2.5 million years!! Its like trying to improve the wheel - you cant!!! All you can do is change from crossply to radial and then low profile or whatever to improve functionality and I believe Yamadasan has done that - twice now. As for...
By the way I started a thread on these knives just yesterday - the one just before yours. What a coincidence!
Thats Sha Ra Ku mono
Hi kuan This is a knife designed by Komin Yamada for Fujitora (mainly known in the west as Tojiro). Yamada san was the designer responsible for Global knives. This particular model is used in conjuction with a wooden board with a circular hollow and works exactly the same as a traditional mezzaluna but only needs one hand! Is he brilliant or what - this whole new range is outstanding - its sharper, more ergonomic, far more enduring egdes and way easier to...
hi if you are still looking then you have to decide between sharpness (hardness) and toughness. the hattori is the same central core steel as the tojiro senkou - VG10 from Takefu Special Steel; the Blazen is a powder steel from Hitachi S S - so less likely to chip and capable of higher sharpness its made by Ryusen who also make the Hattori. Alternative is to get a powder steel blade that uses either a Daido or Kiobe Steel -they have the capacity for higher levels of...
The fundamental differenc is the edge profile. A Santoku edge stays straigter for longer than western knives. So any action that is horizontal is more efficient - espeacially when cutting soft or maleable textures. The wider blade also makes the blade better for veg - paarticulaarly mincing - the hilt end tends to be wider and the edge flatter.
Hi I notice that your choices only contain European knives. Have you considered a true Japanese knife - not a 'Gaijin' knife like Global or Shun? The really good ones are sharper, staay sharper longer aand are faar easier to resharpen - and there are thousands available in Stainless
Hi My name is Jay and I sell, repair and restore the finest Japanese knives. If any member wants information about knives I will do my best to help. Hope to hear from you Jay
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