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Posts by Luc_H

actually Mike, rubbing compound is a great idea.  You can also use Glass-ceramic cooktop cleaning cream; it's basically food grade rubbing compound.  Very useful to remove many stains on glass and steel. Luc H.
Bar Keepers Friend contains oxalic acid which is highly corrosive to stainless steel   http://www.barkeepersfriend.com/files/file/MSDS_BKF_Powder_1_1_14.pdf http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bar_Keepers_Friend   I suggest you use it again with water to remove the stain but don't let it sit long. You may have already damaged the surface beyond repair though.   Luc H.
Here's an excellent reference: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/   Key points: use flax seed oil 450 to 500F 2 to 3 hours apply in a thin layer: I used a paper towel that I dip in oil and rub the whole surface while it's hot. the seasoned layer is complete when the pan appears dry (no streaks with little or no droplets) You can build up seasoning with consecutive application of complete cycles.   Luc H.
If I was faced with many choices of creams, I would choose according to the intended use, look and feel. examples: whipping creams (retail) with additives are stable in coffee, taste ok, and whip up stiff with less fat. Raw heavy cream is great to pour over berries and soups Raw manufacturing cream whips up stiff and has tons of flavour and mouthfeel, also perfect to make crème fraîche.   Luc H.
Maybe a science perspective will help answer the oil drops question: Background info (long answer): raw whole milk is comprised of water, lactose (sugar), water loving proteins, fat loving proteins and both water & fat loving proteins. when left standing raw milk separates to cream and milk.  The cream is on top because oil/fat is lighter than water particularly water weighted with sugar (i.e. lower fat milk at the bottom). The natural use of milk is to feed an infant a...
Hi Koukouvagia, I love cooking with cast iron. There's nothing like using a well seasoned pan. My technique: I never wash the pan with soap and water. Usually, just wipe clean with a paper towel is enough.  High protein foods like steak will leave a residue that cannot be wiped off though.  Get yourself a non-metallic brush (I get mine at an Asian supply store for cleaning woks).  When food sticks to the pan, add water, heat on burner until the water boils and...
Hey Shel,   Milk proteins have the ability to bind iron (some of it as lactoferrin).  I have always thought that soaking liver in milk reduced the metallic taste of the liver by removing unbound iron. other metals also bind to milk like copper and zinc so it is not a stretch to think that toxic heavy metals could also be bound by milk proteins hence the notion of detoxifying the liver.   Luc H.
phatch is right, Dark soy goes along way! if you look at the ingredients, caramel colour is often in the top ingredients.  Caramel colour is in fact chemically caramelized sugar.  If you can get your hands on the caramel colour, that will work without adding any flavour. It is an industrial food chemical.  This company makes it:http://www.sethness.com/?gclid=COa1neeLwaoCFcPBKgodmAxO7g If you read ingredients you will see that this stuff is everywhere: cola, fondants,...
Hello qed5, Some insightful corrections to your explanation: Some people cannot digest lactose because they lost the ability to manufacture lactase (a digestive enzyme) after childhood (like all mammals do except humans). Humans never have the enzymes to digest non-glucose polymer chains like oligosaccharides which are often composed of other saccharides like fructose, galactose, etc..  Oligosaccharides are digested by gut microflora only and flatulence occurs or not...
Ever since I started graduate studies, I have been amazed by what a bunch of intelligent people can come up by collaborating. I wonder if by collaborating we can predict the source on the E. Coli contamination:   Let me start some ideas: Escherichia coli is a fecal bacterium.  (fecal coliform) can live with or without oxygen (anaerobic facultative) Lives in warm blooded animals. Mostly mammalian animals but also birds. Does not live long outside the...
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