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Posts by stir it up

koko, what % of wheat flour to rye flour are you using? Rye has different properties than wheat flour in terms of its gluten, rye has pentosans and the sourdough functions in part to prevent a gummy loaf, the acid sourdough helps make sure the loaf doesn't degrade, which is especially important in one that is higher % rye with less wheat. So for success with rye without a sourdough, use one that has a higher %of bread flour IMO. I've never used vinegar, I use a good...
hi Luella, yes we have grown pumpkins in quite a few different varieties. One thing you might like to check into, is a variety that has hull-less seeds. So you get the smaller green seeds that are ready to eat like pepitas, instead of the big oversized white ones with the hard hulls that are unpleasant to eat. If you're going to have a lot of them and they're for carving, it's nice to enjoy the seeds. We grew one called Kakai, the pumpkins were ok for flavor, not...
Steam makes things brown more. So don't give it more steam than needed for oven spring, make sure the steam is "cut" as soon as the loaf has sprung. I block the vent of my home oven for the steam phase, then open it up as soon as the steam has helped the loaf spring. Your 1 cup could be too much and for too long? You're not spritzing your loafs with water at any point are you? Some people do that:suprise:, that will get you too browned a loaf also. If you want to...
is it safe? :suprise: LOL... I was thinking roasted beets. Plain unspiced applesauce if eating is also an issue. I also make a beef dish, sort of Indonesian, simmered in a sauce from coconut milk, cumin, coriander seed (and leaf at the end), nutmeg, chili pepper, generous fresh ginger, lemon juice, a little soy sauce. When it's simmering I have a few whole cloves in there, and some cinnamon sticks. I was thinking that made with or without the cloves. It...
I totally disagree with using Pam, or any other bakers spray on Bannetons. Ew. Maybe that is more foolproof in Fantes' mind, but I think most bakers wouldn't resort to that. Bannetons are expensive, hopefully you haven't sprayed yours with Pam yet. Use a non-stick type of flour to flour them, rice flour or rye flour is usually what I use depending on the bread. Wheat flour is more sticky due to its wheat gluten, so I recommend avoiding wheat flour on your bannetons. ...
go here foodnfoto Wild Yeast it is a wonderful blog from a woman who went to sfbi (San Francisco Baking Institute). She has a section on Hot Cross Buns, good photos, good instructions. Her formulas are generally very well developed. I haven't made the Hot Cross Buns from her site yet. Ack, now you got that darned song going through my head! :mad: :crazy: she does have a tiny bit of cinnamon in the dough. I fresh grind it from cinnamon sticks versus...
Nicko, I haven't used that one, but I've used another similar looking motorized one. I have another recommendation for you instead, which I couldn't recommend more strongly, and that's the nice made in Italy heavy pasta attachments for the Kitchen Aid mixer (attaches to the front attachment hub). It's the set of three, model 4KPRA (not to be confused with the cheapo pasta extruders). Then you'll have more watts behind it than the 90 watts that the one in your link...
Thanks Mezz. I ended up doing it in a salt crust, I've done all sorts of different things even confit. I like the flavor of that cut, and the leanness, but it is a challenge finding a great way to cook it. I'll check out the cook's illustrated link you posted.
Tom Robbins fans, TR also has a healthy respect for the right tomato. Read Villa Incognito and I think it's called Wild Ducks Flying Backward (you know that newer book where he cleaned out his drawers for bits and pieces of writing and made a million bucks) :smoking: Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates is a blast too. While we're at it, add Seattle to the love-in also. What an awesome city and people. Luc, that's how I do my beets too usually at home, sometimes...
celeriac and celery root are used interchangeably. There are some particular varieties of celery that are bred to have a larger root, where a good sized root to be sold as celeriac is the main goal versus the stalks. Then there are others that are bred for the quality of the stalks. You can eat the top celery off a plant that was bred for celeriac, it generally won't be as nice. And you can dig up the root of celery that's grown for stalks, but it generally won't be...
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