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Posts by stir it up

For home cooking now, I have developed a case of lazyitis and I never sear my slow cooked beef anymore.:blush: Who'da thought! And it's been a liberation! Excellent post Greg! and I would do the same with tenderloin, etc... We get a lot of locally raised organic beef, and I got tired of messin' up the place with splatter and smoke from searing (I know you can sear in the oven too bla bla bla). Plus there was an author on the radio who talked about the chemicals...
herbs, oh yeah, all the way. Tomatoes, you're probably better to forget it indoors in the NE. Or if you try it you will need full sun from all directions (including above like a greenhouse), and/or especially adapted greenhouse varieties. And you still won't get amazing results IMO. They are hot growers, outside in FULL sun in the summer is generally the way to go. If you live in a house and not an apartment, you might want to check out the book Four Season Harvest...
Thanks Indigo, I'll have to try the gratinee. I've only done them with brown butter and sage, with a light grating of nutmeg.
I just made some based on a recipe from Joe Ortiz's The Village Baker. I used the Apple Bread with Apple Starter recipe. I made a couple loaves of that bread, then thought I would make some Cinnamon Rolls from it too. I didn't peel the apples (they were organic) to get hints of red and pinkness in the bread. It's a recipe with about 3/4 unbleached and 1/4 rye flour. So the dough had apple chunks in it, then I flattened it out and rolled into cinnamon rolls. They...
I would also try to see if you can get "Bread Alone." I often hear chefs extolling the importance of the bread basket. If you want to reconsider making your own without making a big production out of it, I could give you some formulae for some easier to knock off breads... there are even a couple quick breads (aka no yeast) that are pretty cool. I do one with walnut (or walnut-raisin, walnut-prune), also one with sundried tomato, pine nut and provolone. Then with...
Fer sure! a few other notes on avocadoes... I find the browning is more of an issue if they are not at the proper stage of ripeness. Underripe also seems to mean they're more vulnerable to browning. I understand that most avocadoes are picked when not ripe, they ripen off the tree. So I find the best way to go with avocadoes is to buy them moderately underripe, then ripen them at your facility. That way they don't have dents and squishes from some being overripe,...
Your duck sounds divine. I love the pomegranate. We just had duck last week with a wild grape sauce, you're reminding me of it, it was clear, not cream, might be worth considering a clear pomegranate sauce? I also like the sound of your leek soup, especially as a clear soup thinking French Onion as you say, it's making me crave Gruyere! I had some thoughts on the butternut ravioli, or the butternut risotto as suggested. (I also sometimes do a fairly light...
Another vote for Marcella Hazan's Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking. A friend and foodie bought it for me because he couldn't believe I didn't have it. It used to be two volumes in my understanding, then was condensed into one. then when you get it, make Braised Pork Chops with Sage Modena Style, Roast Chicken with Lemons, Grilled Fish Romagna style (three VERY simple recipes that are delicious). And the Spinach and Ricotta Gnocchi with prosciutto in them. ...
Scott, IMO an egg wash (as described by panini) gives you a slightly prettier, more glossy look versus butter. Butter is a little more matte. I generally think of it as more for the gloss than the golden brown color as you describe, though it does enhance that too. Next time you bake, do some with butter, some with egg wash, and you will learn all the subtle and not-so-subtle differences (there is also a difference with the texture of the crust you get). Each has its...
I loved the Bread Bakers Apprentice too, and also recommend it highly. It's a winner of the James Beard Foundation book awards, and the IACP Book of the Year, etc. It's been a standard breadbaking text for some time, and it's a good one to get also. (BTW I'm just working my way through Reinhart's book on Whole Grains, it seems amazing too for you Reinhart fans, he used 350 recipe testers and made quite a project out of mastering the challenges of whole grains). ...
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