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Posts by stir it up

If you want something a little easier to obtain than fresh buffalo mozzarell, try to get the mozzarella cheese from an Italian domestic cheese company, that comes in a round-ish ball, shrinkwrapped, not a square brick.
We have a friend who brings us hunted deer sometimes. What I've done with the "stewing" roast cuts is "confit." You'll need a small-ish pot with a lid, not much bigger than the roast, that can go in the oven, so no plastic handles or whatnot. Then you'll need enough oil to totally submerge the roast. You can rub the roast with herbs, or I just usually season the confit oil, with herbs, garlic, whatever. Basically you slow cook (at low temperature) submerged under...
maybe if you google cake with "ground almonds" or almond flour. There are lots of really nice cakes you can make where finely ground almonds substitute for some or all of the flour. I wouldn't do what you said with almond extract in simple syrup. Even with pure almond extract, that can produce a fake taste, especially when not mixed into the cake batter and baked. If you're after that, I say go to almond liqueur first. If it were me I'd make a baumkucken, almond...
Trust me that this is how you get what you're after without worry. I just did one this week. It will give you pink and deliciously juicy, but not overly rare as you said. I shudder at the idea of well done leg of lamb, I wouldn't mind stewing other cuts like that, but not the leg. You will need a thermometer. That is the best way, rather than going on time. Then if you take it out at the exact temperature, and let it sit, and it will "re-absorb" its juices and...
I have a dear friend who is a fan of chocolate and peanut butter together, so I've made a few things in that department. Martha Stewart had a great recipe a while ago, for a chocolate cookie (chocolate cookie dough), with small chocolate chips in it, then you made a peanut butter center, and wrapped the chocolate cookie around it, it went over spectacularly well. Maybe you could check on her website?
lavine, don't soak the bagel baker. The reason people sometimes soak a clay baker is to attempt to try to get extra steam. A significant purpose of steam is to try to max out the "oven spring" so your bread will rise higher. A secondary function of steam is that it can contribute to browning. Your bagels have already been boiled, IMO they don't need extra steam. Clay bakers also provide steam just by having a lid on them. I've seen pro bakers flip bagels in...
another tiny tip I thought of with the soft rolls you're after, is to put a clean tea towel on them when they're cooling. That will re-direct the steam into the top crust, so with the crust more moist, it won't draw as much moisture out of the crumb. Since you're after a soft bun for your crowd. I thought of you yesterday as I baked a 100% durham/semolina loaf (at home) that was so soft and really stayed that way. It's day 2, still very soft, I don't know if any will...
what about a bit of a simple syrup to soak the cake with rum, lime juice (lime oil also if you want), mint (you could do fresh peppermint in a pestle & mortar or use other methods). just want to make sure it says "mojito"
I've actually never made crullers, but most recipes for them contain eggs. If you think of their texture that makes sense. I was also thinking the name Pointex just sounds like a shortening (liquid), but maybe foodpump is on to something that it was some type of egg replacer product, as eggs are missing in that cruller recipe. anyhow, here's a cruller recipe for you kristin for comparison, or you could google more Cooks.com - Recipe - Crullers got any more recipes...
not true, foodpump is on the right reason, the reason to not use chocolate chips, is they are made to hold a chip shape when you bake your cookies at 350F, not for melting purposes. Sadie, your cake sounds great though, and very beautiful and impressive especially for a home cook! Whomever has you cooking for them is very lucky:chef:
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