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Posts by Elfin

Cake flour has the least amount of gluten-forming proteins... probably your shortbread will turn out ok if you use AP but will not be as soft and crumbly as the recipe intends. I think the texture differences between cake/pastry/AP/bread and especially hi-gluten are absolutely dramatic... but with something like a shortbread, you should be ok. As far as I know, there is no conversion required... just substitute flour pound for pound and the only difference is the...
I posted this fascinating and quite negative article about an LCB in another thread, but I'll repost it here since this thread is right on topic! wweek.com/editorial/3405/10113 I am a CC student and we run a restaurant too... not only that, but also a cafeteria, off-site catering and a full-service bakery. All students are rotated thru all areas, and many opportunities exist to participate in various extra events. From what I've seen of the local LCB, there are not...
Published today, this interesting article sums up pretty much everything I've ever heard about Western Culinary Institute, which is the Le Cordon Bleu school in Portland, Oregon. A very in-depth article about specific complaints from former students. wweek.com/editorial/3405/10113 You will have to cut and paste this, as this site won't allow me to post links, for some reason. I am a CC student, and in contrast, my tuition for the entire year's program is $3,000....
In my course of couverture study, we use a much higher percentage of chocolate to heavy cream in a ganache formula for truffle fillings, instead of equal amounts. So I do think you chose the correct solution here... just add more chocolate. I have never heard of tempering ganache (only bringing it to working temp, not to exceed 90 degrees F if you are filling shelled molds), nor a need to bring the liquor up to a certain temp, nor that refrigeration ruins ganache?? I'm...
I found a cream powder at myspicer. com which sounds interesting, however, it says that it doesn't reconstitute well and is best only for baking. Also, it doesn't list the fat content or the ingredients... sounds like it has some artificial stuff in it. Heavy cream should be 35-40% milkfat.
I am guessing that what you are looking for is not heavy whipping cream, but lard. Lard is the body fat from an animal, not the fat from the milk. Is this what you are looking for?
You could simply roll out your cookies on parchment paper... or a silpat mat if you have one....
If you did, boxed mixes don't have the structure to hold the weight of the fondant. If you made your cake from scratch, you probably need to either adapt your recipe or try a new one. Fondant can be very heavy and pull a cake apart. Try cakecentral .com for good info and recipes, there are a lot of helpful and experienced folks there. Your cake should come out of the pan very easy to handle and cut with no weakness or crumbling. Also, you should freeze it well (preferably...
Boy, I sure think you've gotten some good advice here. I've done a lot of amateur experiementation with yeast and laminated doughs with sometimes good/sometimes bad results... mostly from my lack of understanding of what I did wrong. Now I am in baking school and finally getting some book knowledge of gluten development shed a lot of light on the entire process. I previously thought that successful bread structure was mostly dependent on yeast... wow, was I wrong, ir's...
Thanks for the interesting answers, everyone. Although I am new to culinary school I am in my 40s and have been around a wide range of folks in the workplace... but the only other profession I've ever been in that had such a curious mix of personalities was high tech. But there, there are few big personalities... mostly just a bunch of mouse-quiet intellectuals. Thanks for shedding some light on it all!
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