or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by boar_d_laze

Let's start with a little bit about Shun itself.  Shun is a collaborative venture between the Japanese knife company "Kai" and the American company "Kershaw."  Shun are made in Japan but most of the design is done over here.  If I'm not mistaken, most of the early profiles, including Classic, Premier, and most of the others still sold, were designed by Ken Onion.    The Ken Onion series itself shared the same blade profiles as those other lines, but added...
Thwwwt!    BDL
Sadly, after several dozen roasts, I've concluded that this roaster is not the right one for me.   Most of the roasts I've done have ended with very good to excellent results.  However, the Amazon has only borderline roasting power under the best of circumstances.  Those include a charge weight below 1kg, desiring a fairly slow roast, and a reliable, steady electric supply.  The first thing was no big deal.  I could make my peace with the second.  But no matter what...
Ceramic has a few advantages compared to steel -- the largest of which is that ceramic hones don't scratch.  That said, any very fine rod, as long as it's long enough (longer than the knife) will do.   The knife's profile is its shape, as viewed from the side.  A chef's knife has a an arc or straight line along the spine, which drops (or not) to the tip.  Tips come can be high, spear-point, dropped, or several other variants.  The blade has a curved section which...
Shun Premier uses the same san-mai (three layer laminate) construction, with the same core alloy (VG-10) as Shun Classic.  The only differences between the two lines are appearance and handles.  Classic handles are straight "D" shaped, and either right or left-handed; while Premier handles are ambidextrous with an "ergonomic" curve.   For what it's worth, Shun Classic handles aren't exactly "wa;" even though they look like it.  The Premier handles might as well be...
Looking at my last post, I realize I might have been unclear.  Unlike Jon, I'm very much in favor of steeling when it's appropriate.  But I agree with Jon that a Blazen is an inappropriate candidate.      BDL
How important is the difference in alloy?  Not very.    Is there another knife which combines the profile of the Uraku with the alloy of the Richmond at a similar price?  Yes and no.  The Sakai Takayuki Wa Gyuto is made from AEB-L like the Richmond, but because of different heat treating requires more maintenance.  I'm not quite sure how it compares to the Uraku in that respect.    It has a very good profile, excellent F&F, sharpens very easily to a really good...
Uraku is thinner, has a lower profile, and better F&F on the blade.  The Addict is tall -- very tall -- and is available in a range of alloys all of which are better than the Uraku.  It's made OEM for Richmond and Richmond blade cosmetics can leave something to be desired.    Both are extremely functional, high-value knives.  Can't lose.    I think Phaedrus -- who occasionally posts oh CT -- has extensive experience with the Addict, but am not sure how often he...
Without getting into the oft-repeated discussion about "strength," "hardness," "toughness," and their inter-dynamics...Anything 63RCH or harder, PM or not, should NOT be steeled unless it's also very tough.   At 61RCH -- which isn't uncommon for CPM 154 -- you're probably OK as long as there's not too much asymmetry, you don't use more than a few strokes; and use very light pressure.   Even then, be careful.      You might get away with steeling M390 (a tough PM)...
The Bu-ry-zen is a decent cutter, it's pretty, has a fairly good handle, and is reasonably agile.       You're right about my dislike having something to do with its damped feel.  But here's the rest of the list:  I don't like 8" knives (remember this one was a gift); I can't steel it because it's too hard; the profile is only okay; it's scratchy on the stones and not easy to sharpen.  Mostly what I don't like about the Bu-ry-zen is that it fails to excite me in any...
New Posts  All Forums: