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Posts by MaryB

Simplifying a bit, less food variety. Turkey with bread stuffing, gravy, sweet corn, pumpkin pie. Just cooking for myself so the smallest turkey I can find. The stuffing gets vacuum bagged and eaten as leftovers. Lasts 6+ months that way in the chest freezer. Turkey gets eaten fairly fast in sandwiches so I vac pack 2 meal size portions then freeze. Pull out for hot or cold turkey sandwiches. Just cooking for myself again this year, not up to a bunch of company with this...
This will not be fancy, it is stick to your ribs food for fall. Have hamburger stew cooking, started with 2 soup bones that I roasted until nicely browned, added a packet of Lipton beefy onion soup and covered with water. Simmer until meat on soup bones is tender. Pull meat off and reduce stock a bit. Add hamburger broken into little bite size pieces, chopped onion, chopped carrot, green beans cut in bite size pieces, sweet corn, some tomatoes, 1/2 pint tomato sauce. Let...
This will sound odd but leftover rib hash is good stuff. Strip the cooked meat off the bones(I usually use the trim off St.Louis ribs for this), chop then add to fine diced baked potato. Serve with 2 fried eggs on top for the lunch crowd.
I make the pizza inn dough form the site TeamFat linked. Make extra and after the overnight rise I punch it down and freeze it. Take it that morning and toss it in a loosely covered container to thaw and rise again. I almost always have pizza dough balls in the freezer for that purpose. It can be quick thawed and rise in a oven you heat to 100 degrees, turn off and then put the dough in to rise but the long counter top rise is much tastier because the dough develops better...
Best bet would have been to brown the meat, add water to the pan and simmer it slow until tender. Small pieces of meat do not work well for baking unless in a liquid. It could have been used to make kabobs on a grill also but it would have been a bit chewy and tough.
When I was remodeling this house in the first 5 years I lived in it(I aid as I went, no credit so it was slow going) all I had to cook on was a 2 burner propane camp stove, crockpot, and a toaster oven(largest I could afford and find). With those 3 I turned out a full blown thanksgiving dinner for 12 one year. Pot roasts are easy, soups, meatballs in gravy, hamburgers/hotdogs, grilled sandwiches, omelets of all types, you can even find a burner top oven that is used with...
While I could help I won't. You need to learn this on your own and helping students with homework is discouraged here. Answering a very specific question to clear something up yes but this is way to broad.
Always wanted to build a small cider press, make maybe 20 gallons a year. Use half that to ferment into hard cider, other half for drinking unfiltered and unpasteurized so the flavors are intact. Kept frozen it is not  a health issue with possible germs.
Modern water cured hams are tasteless blobs of salt. I don't care for the texture even. A picnic ham I can live with, more flavor but still that water logged texture that just turns me off compared to the country ham I ate as a kid. Grandpa always had a couple hams aging in his smokehouse back in a spot away from the heat. So every time he made a batch of sausage or bacon the hams got a little bit smokier. After 12 months he would bring one in for a holiday meal. I miss...
In my family several of us kids took over supper cooking duty early on. My oldest sister did when I was 4, when I was 9 I took over skipping the middle sister who can burn water. I learned to make corn starch gravy before my older sister, and a lot of other foods by watching mom cook on her days off. Both my parents worked full time and with 5 kids we all had to pitch in. That included hunting for food many days. Chicken chow mein with some squirrel added was not to bad a...
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