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Posts by SeabeeCook

I agree with @Jimyra. How are you going to work with (or around) meal production for the camp. Will the students assist in any way with meal production for the camp? Who supplies food and supplies for teaching? That will require coordination with the chef so you're not dipping into  ingredients for meals.   A though on pay: Many camps pay staff a daily rate vice hourly pay (all my staff are on a daily rate with no overtime). Will the camp provide housing if it's in a...
These answers are for my family camp. We feed anywhere from 75 to 300+ campers from three buffet lines (two meat and one vegetarian). Around 75% of our families come through the line in the first 20 to 30 minutes for a one-hour meal period. They drift in after the rush.All eggs are cooked on the flat top -- cooked to soft scramble, never more. Over easy, etc., when done, are also on the flat top.Flat top on even rarer occasions.All breakfast meats are baked in the oven. We...
In cash ... no checks
I went through something close last year. I was cooking in a drug rehab facility for six months between summer seasons at the camp. I had previously been a full-time chef for this company when it was under contract with the dept of corrections. As a retired corrections food manager, I have no problem passing background checks. So, I been working for four months this time when the director informed me that I needed to hide between lunch and dinner. He never ran a new...
She's the chef and owner with her husband at the Martin Pescador Lodges. The website is http://martinpescadorfishing.com/. The original post is a year and a half old. I learned this from a Google search.
Wurst Haus in Jackson, Texas, has a number of position training manuals on-line. You can find them through a Google search at https://www.google.com/search?q=wurst+haus&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#newwindow=1&q=wurst+haus+training+manual. No sous chef manual. But the others may help.   Look at this one as well: http://lcrgmgmt.wikifoundry.com/page/sous+chef+-+english.
I'm not sure I every knew there was such a thing as a cake tester, at least not in any commercial kitchen that I've worked in. I use a toothpick (no, not the one in my mouth!), the blade of a paring knife or the thermometer probe. The toothpick is tossed. The knife and thermometer are cleaned and sanitized after use. Any fork, spoon or similar utensil for poking, tasting, etc., should be used once then sent to the dish room.
It kind of defeats the purpose of Chef Talk when you're being directed to Google when posing a question. Yes, anyone can search Google for the answer to their question. And while Google may be good starting point, Chef Talk lets you interact with professionals and home cooks alike. Each group brings its own unique blend of strengths and weaknesses to the discussion. An answer from a knowledgeable member helps you gain the information that you're looking for. Members may...
I begin with a notebook, then type into a Word file, then print for a binder. Just make sure you backup to multiple media. I use both a flash drive and an on-line account. At one time, all my recipes were transferred to my phone as well. Electronic media is fairly secure. All I've every lost since buying my first PC in late 80s are two years worth of images. To save space, I'd moved them onto a external hard drive, then the drive crashed. My mistake was in failing to...
Most of my formal recipes are kept in Microsoft Word with files on my laptop, on a USB flash drive and on my DropBox account. The DropBox account is helpful because I can access the recipe anytime I have an Internet connection. My work recipes (mainly for the camp) are written to 100 servings. They are printed and filed in binders for easy access by the cooks. My personal recipes are written for 25 servings. I also keep a large collection of camping and Dutch oven recipes...
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