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Posts by SeabeeCook

Contact one of the personal chef associations for assistance (http://www.personalchef.com/ or http://uspca.com/). @chefbuba is right. As long as you're working under a "cook for hire" arrangement, you can purchase the food at the market on the cook day, transport it safely to the client's house and prepare the meal(s). My county (El Dorado County, California) recognizes this arrangement of its website. You do need a health permit to operate a traditional catering business...
Get ahold of Franklin Barbecue by Aaron Franklin and Jordan MacKay. Not a true cookbook, it takes you through the process of good Central Texas barbecue. Each chapter covers a different aspect of barbecue, like smoker construction (or remodeling a store-bought model), the wood, fires, meat selection and the cook, etc. It's a great read. I've used it to improve my weekly barbecue at the camp.
If asked, "Would you rehire him?" Ah, no!
I lead by example and do not swear myself. Rarely can you catch me use swear words. As a result, most of my summer staff withhold swear words around me. Yes, I hear 'F' bombs on occasion, but as a rule we run a clean kitchen (double meaning!).
Then why not cut your losses right now and get a kitchen job? I don't think you're obligated to take the 15-16 money even though you're completed the FAFSA process for the school year. While you're gaining experience in a commercial kitchen, re-evaluate your future, including a community college culinary program. It's never too late to (partially) reverse the effect of rash decisions.
@BakingBee Shoes for Crews. I buy a new pair every year. You can walk through the deep fat fryer ("Don't try this at home, we're what you call 'experts'!") and maintain a solid grip the deck.
@jondstewart 's point is valid. Housing, medical care and meals are provided in military facilities. The services do not give housing and food allowances to everyone, but only to those who are married. For your average single E-3 and E-4 that lives in the barracks and eats in the mess hall, base pay is it.
I know a southern chef that mixes melted butter and sour cream in the pasta before adding the cheese sauce. With that much fat, it has to be good! The recipe is from Cooking in the Deep South with Chef Bob.   CHEF BOB'S MAC & CHEESE   1 pound elbow macaroni 4 quarts water 4 Tablespoons salt 1 stick butter ½ cup sour cream Bring water and salt to a boil, add pasta and stir for 1 minute. Cook for 8-10 minutes. Drain and reserve pasta water. Place hot pasta in a bowl....
@Chefross -- @jondstewart was saying you could make $15 to $30 per hour working for the federal government after separation from the service. A Navy CS3 with two years service makes $2122.80 per month base pay or the equivalent of $12.24 per hour for a 40-hour week. It's even less per hour when you consider that they often work longer hours without the benefit of overtime. In the Armed Forces, all service men and women of equal pay grade make the same salary, regardless of...
The Navy changed the title of the mess management specialist (MS) rating to culinary specialist (CS) in 2004. While most Navy CSs serve in ship and shore galleys, there is opportunity to serve in smaller messes, such as the captain's mess or flag mess. A select few serve in the White House mess. The down side is the management of shipboard and shore living quarters.   Yes, as @Nicko pointed out, a Navy CS may also serve in a combat zone on-board a ship or on land. Many...
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