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Posts by SeabeeCook

@Peachcreek I am also retired. I work like crazy at a summer camp for four months each summer. My fall, winter and spring are pretty quiet. I haven't worked between seasons for a couple years except for the occasional odd job.   I have two resumes. The first one clearly states that I am looking for seasonal work. I summarize my experience on page one and list my post retirement employment on page two. My full-time career in government institutions is reduced to a single...
I have carried a pocket knife since high school (or before) and have had my current knife (a twin blade Old Timer) since the 70s. It goes with me everywhere except on aircraft. I have keep a Leatherman on my belt except on the rare occasion that I wear a suit. The Leatherman comes in handy for minor repairs, especially when I can't locate the maintenance guys.   Since I wear Levis in the kitchen, pockets are not an issue. Like others it's mainly to open packages, etc.,...
I am in my mid-60s and have no problem navigating modern technology. We 60-somethings aged as early technologies were advancing. I was writing rudimentary code in Basic in college in 1979, using my dad's Kapro in the early 80s and purchased my first PC in the later 80s (an IBM XT clone). If I can manage to pay with my debit/VISA card at the supermarket checkout line, I can use an iPad to read recipes. My recipes are stored both on my laptop in Microsoft Word and MasterCook...
He's right @foodpump ... yes, armies are mobile, and as such, the logistics aspect of the job is multiplied. But the services have that all figured out. The cook doesn't have to re-invent Class I resupply in the field. All he has to do is to learn the logistics system, the field kitchen equipment and the different field rations (A rats, B rats, MREs, UGRs, T rats, etc. (I'm dating myself now!)). I think what he's saying is army cooking best compares to institutional...
I gained valuable experience in contingency operations in the US Navy (both in the fleet and in the Seabees). This summer at the camp I had to deal with a water shortage (water filter issue in the camp's water treatment plant), power outage (local electric company issue) and propane outage (kitchen tanks ran out of gas). Experience teaches you to think on your feet, consider options and take steps to get the meal out on time. During the propane outage, I baked coffee cake...
I can only speak to the US Navy. Expect lots of hard work and long hours with low pay. You will have duties other than the galley. In the US Navy to cooks (called culinary specialists) also operate the barracks on shore stations and the wardroom on ships. You will have military assignments as well. For example, I was a member of a gun crew on one of my ships. I was the damage control petty officer for the supply division on another ship. Those duties were performed after...
As the chef at a summer family camp, I make heavy use of Word and Excel. All of my processes are written down, then typed into Word/Excel files so I don't have to reinvent the wheel each summer. The cooks are responsible for their own prep lists. A pad of paper works wonders. I will prepare the prep list for special events and write it onto the production worksheet (I have the 14-day menu typed into a Word-based worksheet so I don't spend my summer typing). I use...
I agree with @Jimyra. How are you going to work with (or around) meal production for the camp. Will the students assist in any way with meal production for the camp? Who supplies food and supplies for teaching? That will require coordination with the chef so you're not dipping into  ingredients for meals.   A though on pay: Many camps pay staff a daily rate vice hourly pay (all my staff are on a daily rate with no overtime). Will the camp provide housing if it's in a...
These answers are for my family camp. We feed anywhere from 75 to 300+ campers from three buffet lines (two meat and one vegetarian). Around 75% of our families come through the line in the first 20 to 30 minutes for a one-hour meal period. They drift in after the rush.All eggs are cooked on the flat top -- cooked to soft scramble, never more. Over easy, etc., when done, are also on the flat top.Flat top on even rarer occasions.All breakfast meats are baked in the oven. We...
In cash ... no checks
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