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Posts by SeabeeCook

Looks like you've done your homework, JLomb. As others have said, complete your bachelors, then consider pastry school. There's certainly nothing wrong with a college grad working in a trade. I had a classmate in college that intended to go to culinary school after graduation. She would turn her second story apartment into a bakery for catering jobs.I earned by B.S. in dietetics in 1984, but never worked as a dietitian. I've spend most of the intervening years managing...
I'm bias toward military retirement as I completed 29 years combined active and reserve service in the US Navy as a commissaryman and mess management specialist. You say that you're served 9 years to this point. Another 11 years and you can retire with around half pay for life. How does the Air Force view changing your MOS? This may not be possible because you'd be going from a technical field to services (for nom-military folks, Air Force Services is the AF occupational...
I'm curious. Why devote three and one-half years to a bachelor's degree program, only to quit? I say finish the program. You're contemplating to change direction before you know anything about the baking and pastry industry. By your own admission, you have no experience in the hospitality/food industry. How are you paying for college? Assuming you've taken on a bunch of student load debt, I'd look to work in the hospitality industry where you at least have a chance at...
I was a DDS for a year in 1985-86. Chef Ross is right. A lot of your time will be devoted to management and consulting with patients. I spent about one-third to half my time reviewing patient charts and talking to them. I usually only cooked when I had to fill in for a cook who called in sick. You'll probably need to get certified from the Dietary Managers Association. The corporate diet manual will become your "Bible." Learn it inside and out. It defines what you can and...
 Interesting, Bill. Out here in California, I used eSysco in the summer of 2009 for eight weekly orders. The camp, which is located 1-1/2 miles from roads, had been using the on-line system for several years at that point. I presume it still uses it.Has your US Food rep given you any information on the ending merger?
There are two basic ways to order from Sysco. You can use eSysco, their on-line system. It's basic, but works. US Foods on-line system is much better (and one of the reasons Sysco is purchasing USF, I'm told, to acquire their ecommerce platform). The other is to go through the rep. I prefer a face-to-face meeting, where I can confer over new items, etc. Sysco has a $500 minimum. I agree with Bill. A quality sales rep makes all the difference. I good rep will will call...
I was always taught that meatloaf, regardless of the meat being used, should be cooked to 165 deg. F or higher. Anytime you mix a variety of ingredients, as in meatloaf, casserole, stuffed meat and pasta, etc., require the higher internal temp. The 155 internal temp standard is for ground (called "comminuted" in California law) beef, pork or lamb. I went back a read Cal Code, section 114004, and came away confused. The 165 standard is clearly for poultry, ground poultry,...
 I use this scale professionally and purchased it from Old Will Knot Scales last summer for around $35. I believe it was on sale at the time. It works well for the bakery at a mid-sized family summer camp.
Go to Baker's percent on 'Round the Chuckbox for several articles on the topic. (Yes, this is a shameless plug for the blog!)
 Ingredients are listed in order by weight. It means that there is more high fructose corn syrup than soybean oil. It doesn't necessarily mean that HFCS makes up half or more of the product (although that could be true ... I don't eat at Arby's). Ingredient lists only tell you how much there is of each ingredient in relationship to the others.
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