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Posts by ChrisLehrer

Those little teeny packets are more for garnishing, not making fashion, but 3 euros is still ludicrous.
Avocado and salmon go together very well because they are both very flavor-neutral (tend to pick up flavors from other things), oily, yet mild. To combine them, the crucial thing is to break the oil with acid. Both of these ingredients love citrus, especially lime, lemon, and grapefruit. I would suggest experimenting with some kind of citrus gastrique or a very citrus salsa to boost them both. You want your diner to taste the two flavors against one another, with the same...
For basic flattening, a piece of heavy float glass is an excellent reference plate -- and CHEAP. For coarse stones, drywall screen is very effective, too. I personally do not like a jump as much as 800 to 3k: it's a lot of work on the 3k. Last time I bought stones, 2k stones were much cheaper than 3k. For those knives that want more polish, 2k to 6k is fairly trivial; the 3k setup is irrelevant here. I do think Kings are wildly underrated among sharpening snobs. Good...
I personally wouldn't buy a knife whose basic profile I didn't like. So I don't see the point in all this thinning. I know some folks here like that kind of customization, but if you're lost you should ignore all that. Sharpen the bevel that's given to you. With debas, they're usually hamaguri, meaning "clamshell," which means that they are gently concave. This is easy. As you stroke the blade on a bench stone, think about trying not to be completely flat but rather...
I tend to think bigger is better.
I wouldn't think there's much point in a patina with kurouchi. Just cut with it and keep it sharp.
Okay. Here goes. I'm not going to give a full-on diatribe; if you want that, search the ChefTalk wiki thing for my very long article about J-knives. I'll give my considered opinions and others can jump in. I don't use stainless, so I'm not going to give brand or model advice: I don't know enough about it. Others are collector types and will be able to provide such information. Ignoring bread knives, which are sort of their own problem (but cheap), you will eventually want...
As far as I'm concerned, setting aside the basic silliness of the question, I'd say everything depends whether the purchaser wants stainless of some kind or not. That's where the split at the high end happens. If money were no object and someone wanted to blow huge wads of it making me exceedingly happy, I'd say get the Masamoto HS set. 10 knives or so, lists for something on the order of $10,000, comes with fancy case and so on. All honyaki white. No western-style...
With few exceptions, a roundfish is a roundfish. In my experience, a 4" knife is too small, though if the bones are quite thin and delicate you can get away with it. I have used a 105mm with pleasure on smallish trout, for instance. But you are better off going right up to 180 or 195mm, especially as you will be dealing with whole fish: a weighty and thick butt end is useful for beheading, for instance, and in general a bit larger knife is less inclined to slip in your...
My wife and I have just had yet another coffee maker die on us. They seem to last about 1-2 years of moderate use, and then something major fails — like the heating coil, for instance. Does anyone have any advice about getting a new one that maybe won't die so quickly? Thanks!
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