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Posts by ChrisLehrer

SSpeak for yourself!! ūüėú
I bought a Fagor Duo 8-qt pressure cooker about 3-4 years ago, and I've never been entirely happy with it. Now the valve has started leaking, and the gasket still smells slightly of rubber.   I went to Amazon, and found that to replace the gasket, valve, and handle will cost about $45.   If I get a new Presto 8-qt cooker instead, it'll cost $53.   Has anyone got any experience with these that might help me decide which is the better bet?
In some respects it's worse than you're stating. Two strong examples: salmonella in poultry and TB in milk. When I first heard about people wanting "raw milk," I was shocked, because universal pasteurization has been one of the few great public health successes of the USDA. But it turns out that's not precisely true: actually, roughly 100 years ago, there were two major proposals to deal with TB in milk. One proposal insisted on hygienic practices, and the other on...
While we're on the subject, I wonder what people think of this. I was considering doing broiled lobsters with an herb butter. To make the butter, I thought I'd put butter, lots of chervil, some tarragon and parsley, a little white wine, and a little miso into a processor. Adjust salt as necessary. I am thinking of using white (Saikyo) miso, which to me has a very faintly vanilla taste; I know vanilla goes well with lobster, and I think it also goes well with anise...
 Thread's a bit old, but...yes. Save it.Incidentally, for broiled whole: blanch or steam the whole lobsters just until the flesh firms and pulls away from the shell, but leaving the interior raw. Split the lobsters lengthwise (saving the juice etc. of course). Do whatever you're going to do for stuffing -- bread, butter, herbs, whatever -- then broil until the top is sizzling, and it'll be just done and moist.
Do your own homework--that's a general policy here. But... hint: describe the preparation in the timbale. It has a one-word name.
Solved my problem. Digging around in French, I have found that many Russians and Poles in France regularly use, as substitutes for twarog / tvorog, either fromage blanc or faisselle. From this I conclude that I can do the reverse -- why not? Nobody says you have to add salt or cream or anything like that, but just use the one as the other.   So I figure I start with best-quality twarog, work it through a food mill and add the herbs and some cream or perhaps yogurt, make...
Interestingly, some years back, @French Fries asked where to get faisselle, which is more or less step 1 of making this stuff. Basically, it looks to me as though you beat the c**p out of fromage frais (bien claqué), tie it up in cheescloth or put it in a faisselle, and let the whey come out of it. Then you mash it up with herbs, garlic, cream, salt, pepper, and a bit of oil, and eat it.   Pépin's approach, which is probably based on something specific from his childhood...
For you French readers, here's Alain Ducasse's recipe. Just on the off chance he has a clue about this....   https://www.academiedugout.fr/recettes/cervelle-de-canut_832_2
I'll be darned. Never heard that term, just Googled it -- and yes, that's what I'm looking for. Apparently vinegar is pretty common in it, which Pepin doesn't use, but I suspect that's because fromage frais is sweeter than the cream-cheese/sour-cream mix he's working with.   (Incidentally, not surprised that Pepin, a pure working-class guy to the core, doesn't use that term!)   Okay, so back to my question, then. For making cervelle de canut or fromage blanc of this...
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