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Posts by ChrisLehrer

As far as I'm concerned, setting aside the basic silliness of the question, I'd say everything depends whether the purchaser wants stainless of some kind or not. That's where the split at the high end happens. If money were no object and someone wanted to blow huge wads of it making me exceedingly happy, I'd say get the Masamoto HS set. 10 knives or so, lists for something on the order of $10,000, comes with fancy case and so on. All honyaki white. No western-style...
With few exceptions, a roundfish is a roundfish. In my experience, a 4" knife is too small, though if the bones are quite thin and delicate you can get away with it. I have used a 105mm with pleasure on smallish trout, for instance. But you are better off going right up to 180 or 195mm, especially as you will be dealing with whole fish: a weighty and thick butt end is useful for beheading, for instance, and in general a bit larger knife is less inclined to slip in your...
My wife and I have just had yet another coffee maker die on us. They seem to last about 1-2 years of moderate use, and then something major fails — like the heating coil, for instance. Does anyone have any advice about getting a new one that maybe won't die so quickly? Thanks!
Late to this party, but you people missed some crucial things:   Sliders   Bacon everything (I like bacon too, but c'mon, do we have to put imitation bacon bits in everything now?)   The word “whimsical” on a menu   Sourdough everything (most of the time, they're adding fake sourdough flavor, too!)   Restaurants that don’t know the difference between rare/medium/well and a certain number of minutes (a rare steak is hot inside but bloody red; one that looks...
For what (little) it might be worth, I agree with BDL -- and with Benuser about Kramer.   I don't understand where Kramer is coming from at all. Setting aside all the more obvious concerns about the knife and edge, this totally ignores what happens if (as in my case) you use principally Japanese single-beveled knives. With that big flat bevel, there is a definite tendency to stick hard to the stone, and this increases the more force you use. If you have ever had a...
When in doubt, look to what the Italians do. Chop them coarsely, sweat in olive oil with a little salt and pepper, until very soft. Add water or light chicken stock and cook at a simmer for 15 minutes or so. Purée in a blender, then strain coarsely to get rid of any tough fibers. Adjust seasoning, add water if too thick, and serve with crusty bread. If preferred, season heavily and chill before serving. You can extend it by cooking potatoes in it, French-style, or enrich...
As a Chocera user — I've got 400, 800, 2k (and then non-Chocera from there), I'd say it depends a good deal on what you're sharpening. If you are trying to learn to sharpen big single-bevels, Chocera is a great place to be, because you need huge feedback to learn effectively, but you also need something that will cut fast and not dish quickly. For double-bevels, I don't think you gain all that much from the extra bucks. I would go with something cheaper but equally great,...
I'm not sure why you need a slicer for veggies, especially with a gyuto this good.   Mostly slicers are for meat and fish. The questions there are complex, certainly, but veggies don't come into it much. One does see Japanese sushi chefs use yanagiba to do some veg work, but there it's a combination of time (not much — high pressure) and immense familiarity with this knife.   A nakiri does nothing your gyuto doesn't do better. Same with a santoku. An usuba is a...
That's odd. Is it just the photo, or are those characters in relief?   Anyway...   In a month or two I can check, but I think I have a deba like this. It was made in Shikoku. A lot of minor brands are there, in the old district northeast of Koji. They sell a lot through flea markets and the like, which is a big trade in Japanese tools for household use.   Where did you get it?
+12 for everything BDL just said.   There is such a thing as a "do-everything" knife, but it's about as good for complicated and intricate custom work as you'd expect from a good handyman. You want a true jack-of-all trades, you'll get solid but not efficient or elegant. You want perfection, you're going to have to sacrifice some areas of specialization. I don't know of any way around that, and it appears BDL doesn't either, so we're probably more or less right....
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