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Posts by ChrisLehrer

Is chef into things like sharpening, finicky details, and whatnot? Do you intend that he use this thing at work?   (Sorry about these questions, but, while you know he's going to be touched, you don't want him thinking, "gee, I wish they'd gotten me something I'd actually enjoy," you know?)
A butterflied or spatchcocked chicken is closer to square than round, so you might consider a square pan if size is an issue (e.g. if, as in my apartment, a new pan significantly alters the distribution of equipment in a small storage space).   Other than that, I doubt it makes much difference beyond the usual concerns about which metal and so forth. I would tend to plump for medium-low sides, so the bird steams as little as possible.
Hey -- I honestly had no intention to be snarky. There was a whole back-and-forth about what Escoffier actually said, and some people referred to the French text, but nobody gave the original. So I posted it.   To translate, I have to insert some interpretation of what I think Escoffier was trying to get at. Others might disagree. Nevertheless, leaping in where angels fear to tread, the crucial bits:   As I read Escoffier's directions, the point is to mount the sauce with...
Much of this has been debated before, here and elsewhere. There are a very large number of factors that have to be taken into account, not all of which are measurable in a strict sense. A few points worth considering, some of which have already been noted in this discussion, listed here in no particular order:   Is it appropriate simply to divide foods into "organic" and "conventional"? Does this not presume that the various means of classifying "organic," which...
I realize that this discussion may be dead, but it pops up on the ChefTalk website as one of the top "most active" current threads -- which tells you something about that little engine. In any event: This is the first edition of the Guide that I could get access to quickly.   For those interested, he says much the same about Béarnaise, from which recipe (p. 29) I excerpt:  
Speaking principally to those who know something about Korean food (I know what little one can pick up from eating at restaurants and skimming the web) --   The Setup: I recently decided that, in honor of getting old...er, I ought to start eating a bit healthier. My wife, the Japan expert, suggested (I think she was actually kidding, but I missed it) that I try eating that popular Japanese breakfast food, natto, which is both disgustingly healthy and, well,...
Hi all,   I just posted a multi-review of several cookbooks, focused on Shizuo Tsuji's Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. You can find this review here.   Quite apart from plugging my own review unabashedly, I am wondering what you all think of the format. This is something I have discussed with admin types here at ChefTalk several times, and I finally got around to implementing it this way.   The idea is to have a single review essay that treats a range of...
I gather you're a natto fan. Hmm.   It does grow on you. If you don't eat it fairly quickly, it also grows on whatever it's near. Oddly, that's a good thing.   I'm not convinced that something which slowly creeps out and eats everything around it is genuinely food, but.... Ahhhhh... choo!
Hmm. OK: The sort of dashi you have in mind has two basic components: a salt/smoke/sea thing and an umami thing. The former usually comes from katsuobushi or niboshi; the latter almost always comes from kombu.   My suggestion on dried mushrooms was intended to acquire the umami flavor with a bit of that smoke thing you get from katsuobushi (which is smoke-dried or smoked, depending on who's doing it and how). And you are absolutely right: you will not get that same taste...
Hi, Dr. Carl (guessing from your tag),   As far as I understand it, in the United States what you are looking for is usually called skipjack tuna. On the Pacific coast, it may be called bonito, but on the Atlantic coast "bonito" is likely to refer to something quite different, though not entirely dissimilar from a basic gastronomic perspective. And there is a HUGE amount of skipjack -- this is not endangered like bluefin and such. So, ok there.   The problem is...
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