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Posts by ChrisLehrer

+12 for everything BDL just said.   There is such a thing as a "do-everything" knife, but it's about as good for complicated and intricate custom work as you'd expect from a good handyman. You want a true jack-of-all trades, you'll get solid but not efficient or elegant. You want perfection, you're going to have to sacrifice some areas of specialization. I don't know of any way around that, and it appears BDL doesn't either, so we're probably more or less right....
BDL's point is very well taken. The issues here are very complex, because there are many different types of manufacturers, and lots of middle-men, and competition is greatly complicated because it is international. All that together with the intricacies of the government's handling of the yen... what a mess!   For those who aren't expert economists -- i.e. folks like me -- it depends a good deal on why you want to know. If you're looking for a knife and wondering...
I haven't used an EP or other similar setup, but I do have a bunch of Chocera bench stones.   The advantage of Chocera is that they are fast, don't dish much, and they provide a great deal of very subtle feedback. If you are freehanding, feedback is where you live; my sense is that it matters a bit less with a jig setup. The down sides are that they are expensive and very hard, actually designed for chisels and other woodworking tools. Soft stones are better for...
One more thing, as Columbo used to say.   Durability and hardness aren't at all the same thing. Unfortunately, there is no absolute measure on durability: you have to go largely by anecdotal data, and even then it's going to depend on how you sharpen.   Since you do plan to hone often, and don't want to sharpen constantly, just be sure you sharpen your knife pretty much symmetrically. That is, grind it at the same angle on both sides. Most instructions in English...
Notes from the peanut gallery:   1. I was apparently wrong about the Shun profiles. I am sure BDL is right about this: he's right about most things, but also he has actually compared scads of knives head to head, which I haven't. If the Shun is a German profile, I for one am against it. I agree with BDL: a really sharp knife wins over a rocked one any day.   2. The extremely straight edge of the usuba, which is the Japanese traditional professional's vegetable...
You're mostly asking brand questions, not fundamental ones, so I don't have all that much to say. Unlike some folks here, I haven't handled a huge number of knives enough that I could compare knowledgeably. But a few underlying questions arise.   In no particular order:   1. 8" is good, but if using a knife as light as any of these Japanese ones are, I would encourage a 10" if countertop real estate is not drastically threatened. If you expect to be working at a...
+1 Benriner
No worries.   I do feel strongly one thing here, which I want to repeat for you and anyone reading the thread later.   To actually screw up a knife badly, so nobody but a serious pro can fix it, is hard to do. If you want to, you'll need to chip it hard, then grind the chip badly, then chip the same region again. And it must be in a major part of the blade. Beyond that, what can you really do?   Let's suppose you grind really unevenly, OK? And then you learn, and say, uh...
Hmm. This is rather depressing to me, as I generally adore all things Masamoto. I don't have these issues with KS steel, and I'm sorry to hear that HC isn't performing up to that (frightening) level.   Two notes:   1. Masamoto does not ship its own knives sharpened, unless they've changed their policies in the last couple of years. If you bought from a retailer, which I assume is the case, it would be the retailer's job -- or yours -- to put an edge on the knife....
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