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Posts by ChrisLehrer

I absolutely agree with Galley Swiller.   1. Sharpening and maintenance practices will enormously trump steel at this stage of your career.   2. Spend any knife money on your chef's knife.   A few more things:   A. Don't get cute about high-end this or that. In a pro kitchen, a guy with a super high-end knife is likely to be seen as (1) a dick, (2) a showoff, and (3) a target for theft. On top of this, your knife may be grabbed for quick use by some guy who likes...
Sorry, old thread, but just in case...For woodworking tools, such as chisels, you want very hard stones. For kitchen knives, the received wisdom is that you want soft stones. Kings are sort of medium, good for everything and spectacular for nothing.Then again, I have been very happy with very hard stones for my knives, so you'll just have to take this as received wisdom that is probably based on something real.
I'm hoping folks can provide me with some information here. I've never handled a kiritsuke and am wondering about its properties. I know it is a long blade, very slightly curved, single-beveled. Does anyone have opinions or information on: 1. Is it effective as a general-purpose knife? And is that the intention? 2. How does it compare in weight to a comparable gyuto? 3. How steeply angled is the bevel? 4. How well does it expect to tolerate punishment? (Compared to,...
That's not quite accurate. The nakiri and usuba are comparable in this fashion, though actually the nakiri is a much older design. A deba and a santoku are not comparable at all.In my experience, which is I realize very much anecdotal, the Japanese home cook who's passably into cooking is going to have a small deba, a short yanagiba, and a santoku, plus maybe a paring knife and such. The deba is for breaking fish, which home cooks do in Japan with much the same frequency...
That's not quite accurate. The nakiri and usuba are comparable in this fashion, though actually the nakiri is a much older design. A deba and a santoku are not comparable at all.In my experience, which is I realize very much anecdotal, the Japanese home cook who's passably into cooking is going to have a small deba, a short yanagiba, and a santoku, plus maybe a paring knife and such. The deba is for breaking fish, which home cooks do in Japan with much the same frequency...
Take a look at Heston Blumenthal's "In Search Of Perfection" series. He did roasties in one, possibly with roast chicken? You would likely learn a lot about parameters and factors that could help you manipulate your recipe for the situation.
Those little teeny packets are more for garnishing, not making fashion, but 3 euros is still ludicrous.
Avocado and salmon go together very well because they are both very flavor-neutral (tend to pick up flavors from other things), oily, yet mild. To combine them, the crucial thing is to break the oil with acid. Both of these ingredients love citrus, especially lime, lemon, and grapefruit. I would suggest experimenting with some kind of citrus gastrique or a very citrus salsa to boost them both. You want your diner to taste the two flavors against one another, with the same...
For basic flattening, a piece of heavy float glass is an excellent reference plate -- and CHEAP. For coarse stones, drywall screen is very effective, too. I personally do not like a jump as much as 800 to 3k: it's a lot of work on the 3k. Last time I bought stones, 2k stones were much cheaper than 3k. For those knives that want more polish, 2k to 6k is fairly trivial; the 3k setup is irrelevant here. I do think Kings are wildly underrated among sharpening snobs. Good...
I personally wouldn't buy a knife whose basic profile I didn't like. So I don't see the point in all this thinning. I know some folks here like that kind of customization, but if you're lost you should ignore all that. Sharpen the bevel that's given to you. With debas, they're usually hamaguri, meaning "clamshell," which means that they are gently concave. This is easy. As you stroke the blade on a bench stone, think about trying not to be completely flat but rather...
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