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Posts by ChrisLehrer

One more thing, as Columbo used to say.   Durability and hardness aren't at all the same thing. Unfortunately, there is no absolute measure on durability: you have to go largely by anecdotal data, and even then it's going to depend on how you sharpen.   Since you do plan to hone often, and don't want to sharpen constantly, just be sure you sharpen your knife pretty much symmetrically. That is, grind it at the same angle on both sides. Most instructions in English...
Notes from the peanut gallery:   1. I was apparently wrong about the Shun profiles. I am sure BDL is right about this: he's right about most things, but also he has actually compared scads of knives head to head, which I haven't. If the Shun is a German profile, I for one am against it. I agree with BDL: a really sharp knife wins over a rocked one any day.   2. The extremely straight edge of the usuba, which is the Japanese traditional professional's vegetable...
You're mostly asking brand questions, not fundamental ones, so I don't have all that much to say. Unlike some folks here, I haven't handled a huge number of knives enough that I could compare knowledgeably. But a few underlying questions arise.   In no particular order:   1. 8" is good, but if using a knife as light as any of these Japanese ones are, I would encourage a 10" if countertop real estate is not drastically threatened. If you expect to be working at a...
+1 Benriner
No worries.   I do feel strongly one thing here, which I want to repeat for you and anyone reading the thread later.   To actually screw up a knife badly, so nobody but a serious pro can fix it, is hard to do. If you want to, you'll need to chip it hard, then grind the chip badly, then chip the same region again. And it must be in a major part of the blade. Beyond that, what can you really do?   Let's suppose you grind really unevenly, OK? And then you learn, and say, uh...
Hmm. This is rather depressing to me, as I generally adore all things Masamoto. I don't have these issues with KS steel, and I'm sorry to hear that HC isn't performing up to that (frightening) level.   Two notes:   1. Masamoto does not ship its own knives sharpened, unless they've changed their policies in the last couple of years. If you bought from a retailer, which I assume is the case, it would be the retailer's job -- or yours -- to put an edge on the knife....
As always, BDL and I agree and disagree perfectly.   1) I like combination stones for new sharpeners. I have not used the Imanishi stones, but I can say that the considerably cheaper King 1k/6k is a terrific place to begin. It is reasonably fast, soaks smoothly, and has a huge amount of feedback (which means that you can feel what you're doing). It also flattens easily, which helps a good deal. It is pretty much squarely between the soft and hard, perhaps a hair on...
I think that, given your intention to have your knife sharpened for you, the level of edge retention in question isn't huge here. What I mean is, I generally use a range of reasonably high-end carbons (Masamoto KS, for example), which by any standard has good to great edge retention. But I still sharpen these bad boys regularly, at home on fine bench stones, because what gets retained is a pretty-darn-good edge, not a superb one. And once you've experienced a great knife...
Spend the bulk on the knife. For anything but super-fancy carbon, in my experience, wickedly sharp is wickedly sharp, and everything will depend on the knife and the technique, granted a decent stone. (Get a King 1k and learn to sharpen: don't use a Minosharp on a deent knife!)   Case in point: I bought my wife a Masamoto VG 240 gyuto. I have some pretty hard-core knives and stones. I find that it simply isn't worth the trouble to polish this excellent knife: 2k on a...
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