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Posts by ChrisLehrer

I am inclined to think that @MaryB is on to something here.   As she says, most grocery store pork--and chicken, turkey, etc--is full of "retained water." @kokopuffs, you might be very fortunate on this, but if you live in the US I'm betting you just don't know about it. The trick is that when the animal is slaughtered, it's warm, and it's got to be chilled quickly. So the slaughterhouse usually drops it in cold water. As it cools, it absorbs some of that water.   Now...
Well, you can't go by that. There are silly kitchen gadget for all kinds of things.
Why German? I don't mean to pry, but it's an unusual request around here.
Okay, the thing is, most knife shops in Japan have quite limited stocks. If you're looking for some particular knife, you're going to have to know which shop you're going to well in advance. I would recommend that you not do this: you'll waste time better spent doing more fun things in Japan.   The deal on price and such is very simple. You pay based on the exchange rate of Euros to Yen (currently pretty decent, around 1:120). Taxes can be removed at the airport, but...
There's nothing more to it, but if you're having irregularity problems, I suspect that your ingredients aren't all the same size and weight. This means that they settle in the mixture unevenly. You might try putting everything into a relatively wide container and stirring gently from the bottom before using.
Okay, I'm mystified. This is a difficulty I've never experienced.   Here is my sandwich, sitting on the board in front of me. I would like to cut it in half. I have a very sharp chef's knife in my right hand.   I place the tip (not the point, the tip) of the knife at the far edge of the sandwich, just barely resting on the crust. The blade is angled down, perhaps 20-25 degrees. My left hand arcs up over the sandwich, fingertips curled under, the knuckles serving as a...
Think of it this way: every knife is serrated, if you get down to the microscopic level. Whether you go back and forth in the cut, or just in one direction, depends on what you're cutting, what sort of knife you're using, and what results you want.   Examples: If you're cutting crusty bread, a couple quick back-and-forth motions does the trick nicely, and means you don't have to push down and crush the loaf. If you're cutting fish, a lot of back-and-forth is likely...
You could certainly use enameled cast iron, but it's not cheap.
The idea of cataloging my thousands of books brings me out in a cold sweat. But these apps do work, its true.
The Japanese tend to be very focused on new rice well-rinsed. Chinese tastes are much more varied. There are serious gourmets passionate about fresh and rinsed, and others just as passionate that rice must be drier initially, and they may or may not believe in rinsing. As Kokopuffs says, this is the kind of issue that can start a war.
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