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Posts by ChrisLehrer

The Tapatalk version is pretty awful, but you can use that for your app needs. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
You can make absolutely fat-free consommé with two plastic tubs and a little wait-time. You start with very gelatinous stock (pressure cooker is great for this--run it 4+ hours max pressure). In the fridge it should be like soft jello. Now you need two medium-large (say, 2-3 quart) plastic tubs. The object is to get them to sit on top of one another without nesting. I cut the center out of one lid to achieve this. Then you cut or drill a bunch of very small holes in the...
What is this nonsense Shun is yapping about, that a kiritsuke is in Japan considered the knife of a master chef? I mean, advertising I get, but they just purely made that up! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I cooked them in the AM, peeled them, put in a plastic bag, and at dinner time stir-fried with butter and salt, mashed down, and baked. Came out good. Thanks all! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Wow. I'm going to reply at length in a bit. For the moment, can I just say, this response is EXACTLY why I joined and continue to love ChefTalk!!!!!
A Pullman or pain de mie pan works beautifully, but it is very big. Before you start packing in your farce, be sure to fill the pan with water and measure how much: you'll be surprised just how much it will hold. Also note that if you're going to weight the pate (some are for, some against this), you're going to need to cut a new piece of wood or whatever, because it's a peculiar size unlike anything else, and the lid absolutely will not work for the purpose.   One thing...
Let me amplify a bit, since I seem mysteriously to have stumped people (not to mention it's the holidays, so everyone's busy).   Seems to me that the classic approach -- baking the whole thing about 35 minutes at about X temperature -- leaves you in grave danger when it comes to how well cooked the meat is. I mean, no control at all. So I thought I'd completely control the thing by doing it in advance, sous vide, to the perfect temperature.   But it seems like the...
Wow, thanks Someday! When I started reading your post, I thought you were going somewhere quite different, and was all prepared to be kind of truculent. But then I read on. Yikes!   First: the idea of blanching and drying came from Heston Blumenthal, who uses it for roast chicken in his In Search of Perfection. He developed this method while working on Peking Duck, though he ultimately went in quite a different direction with that one. The idea is to make the skin very,...
Oh. That would not be good. Thanks! 
Hmm. Sounds reasonable enough. Why will that help? (I'm not challenging you, I'm just wondering.)
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