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Posts by ChrisLehrer

Both of you make me very happy, actually. Because you are reading me dead right, which suggests that I may be expressing my meaning accurately.   An usuba is a "yes yes yes" thing or a "run like heck and don't look back" thing. There is no middle. Do it or don't. [Yoda: "Do or do not. There is no "try."]  The first month SUCKS. Seriously. If you're not rather good at sharpening, with a great kit to do it, and you aren't willing to shell out pretty serious cash to buy...
As time goes on, I seem to be simplifying:   300mm blue steel yanagiba (secret maker, extremely high quality, long story) 195mm yellow steel (?) yanagiba (minor local maker) 210mm white steel Aritsugu (Tsukiji) usuba 210mm black Aritsugu (Kyoto) deba 105mm Masamoto KS deba   OXO peeler some sorta somethin-er-other bread knife thing weird but functional serrated cheese knife thing   um....   I have a box grater. Does that count?
Lenny, I for one do not discount or dismiss the santoku. I think it has its place. My sole objection is to the strong push some companies make to get western wannabe gourmet home chef types to buy these knives at very inflated prices on the ground that they are "traditional Japanese" whatever.   You are dead right: a santoku is very good in a confined space. If you have ever seen the kitchen layout of the average Tokyo housewife, you know she's working in a teeny...
    I should perhaps note that the big yanagiba is a pretty high-end thing, the short one not so much. The big deba is good, the small exceptional. The usuba is solid professional stuff. That has to be factored into my choices, to be honest. 1. The omission of a gyuto: I actually own a Masamoto 270mm KS wa-gyuto, which is pretty much a Ferrari sort of gyuto, and I admit that at times I miss it. My wife got for Christmas a Masamoto 210mm VG gyuto, which I have sharpened...
Quote: A water bath is a good idea, though as Chris says, not entirely necessary. The problem is that in many ovens, dependent on how air circulates, the outside will end up rubbery-hard before the center is hot -- not really set, but hot. A water bath solves this problem.
  His recipe for those browned deviled eggs is in that very book, The Apprentice, which is not so much about "the cooking of his home" but about his apprenticeship and his early to middle career as a professional chef. It's an extremely good book.   Although that recipe is in the book, as I say, it's pretty straightforward. Hard-boil your eggs (properly: cold eggs, pierced fat ends, into boiling water and then held at a gentle simmer for 10 minutes, dump the water and...
Bad Trends:   Schools and similar institutions doing "our family cookbook" through one of these automatic cookbook website things. Why is that bad? Because (1) the parents are pressured into paying through the nose for the result; (2) the editing and so forth is nonexistent, because automatic, and thus you're paying through the nose for something dead useless; and (3) for some reason a lot of people decide that they should contribute by copying a recipe verbatim from...
Okay, I'll bite.   Figure out a way to make an easy-clean flattop electric range surface that will not heat a slightly warped pan unevenly. Good luck!
I use a 300mm yanagiba for slicing meats that don't have a crust. I use a 195mm yanagiba for slicing meats that do. I use a 210mm deba for fabricating large fish, cutting very hard vegetables, shearing bone, and mincing. I use a 105mm deba for fabricating small fish and occasionally other teeny-tiny jobs. I use a 210mm usuba for all other vegetables. I use a mediocre serrated bread knife for crusty loaves.   Sometimes I use other things that come to hand,...
  Much of what you say here is true in a rather limited sense. Let's be precise:   1) Santoku certainly means "3 virtues," but it is not clear which set of three virtues is intended; you will find at least four lists presented as gospel truth if you search hard enough. One set is a classical formulation of three Buddhist virtues. One set is a kind of modernist re-statement of those same virtues, such that thrift enters into it. One set is a list of foods (usually, but...
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