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Posts by ChrisLehrer

Much as I hate to say it, Geoff, the answer is "nothing much." These surfaces are pretty terrible. Still, the #1 priority must be solidity: if the bottom of a pan warps even slightly, it will only make point contacts with the surface and you will have enormous hot-spot problems.   For this reason, cast iron is terrific if it's very flat to begin with. On the other hand, as already noted, it will scratch your surface.   I have had good luck with Matfer sauce pans and...
I never know how these things are supposed to work. Does this mean that if you are running a restaurant, you are flouting the law if you serve raw fish that has never been frozen? No matter what kind of fish, its source, etc.? Or does ServeSafe not have this kind of legal binding?
Short answer: If they are dead, throw them away. If they are live, you can use them.   Long answer: If they're alive, keep them damp (damp seaweed, damp paper bag, something like that), keep them cool (not frozen, but fridge is fine). Ideally, live lobsters should be frisky: if you pick them up by the middle section (the main section right behind the eyes), they should wave their claws and little legs around and really look like they want a piece of you. If they're...
This thread has mostly moved on from usuba, but chinacats asks a very important question:   Try this as a deliberately exaggerated thought-experiment. Fashion a blade, with a total angle of about 10 degrees, out of tinfoil. Do another from ordinary window glass. Do you see what will happen? In the one case, it'll just crumple before it cuts anything; in the other, it may start to cut, but it will then break. A cheap usuba is made out of steel that simply will not...
In passing: I have tried the D'Artagnan blue-footed chickens, and was not persuaded that the quality is worth the enormous price. I find it particularly irritating that you can only get them dressed one way: plucked and drawn, feet on, some (not entirely consistent giblets), neck and head lopped off. I figure if I'm going to pay for chicken this expensive, I want all the bits: cockscombs, tongues, neck skin, everything. I was told, apologetically, that this cannot be...
I agree with BDL. So, you may be interested to know, does Pepin. If you watch the DVD from which that bit is ripped, you'll see him make two kinds of omelets, which he describes as the "country-style" and the "classic." He does both beautifully, and they look delicious, but they are certainly different things. As he says, "it's not that one is necessarily better than the other, it's just a different way of doing it." He's done that routine in several books and DVDs, so...
1. From your knives' perspective, butcher-block hardwood will always be best. The problem with this is that it will absorb from the cheese. If you leave cheese out on the board, wood of any kind probably isn't ideal, in which case you need a knife that won't be much damaged by something like marble. So my first question would be what sorts of knives does he cut cheese with? Do they have actual sharp edges, or just kinda-sorta blade-like edges, and do they get used for...
Martin, you clearly know what you're doing on sharpening, or if you don't, you know what to do about it. So I take that as a given, OK?   Reading your various posts, it looks to me as though you are looking for something because you want a toy. That's not a criticism: every knife crazy has been there. The one thing I hear from you is "I want to be able to make this thing insanely sharp." Everything else seems to be secondary.   Now I don't know very clearly what...
+1 on Folse, especially that huge encyclopedia thing he did.   On Prudhomme, if you want "authentic country style Cajun," I think in some ways that's only going to be in the Prudhomme Family Cookbook; everything else is spectacularly wonderful, but it's either "going fancy" (Louisiana Kitchen) or experimental/nouveau in some way or other (Fork in the Road, Louisiana Tastes, etc.). I happen to adore Louisiana Kitchen as one of the 10 best home-use cookbooks ever...
  There's nothing to pardon. But we all see now why these stupid terms are so irritating! And as BDL says, there is nothing consistent to refer to what you're talking about. I think Chad Ward has a term for this, but I forget what it is. Personally, I am far too lazy to do this kind of primary/secondary beveling stuff, but I salute your willingness and skill!   I do have a few remarks, even following after BDL's wonderful account.   1. The best angle is probably the one...
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