New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by ChrisLehrer

Come to think of it, you could bake the fish with white wine and some tomatoes on top, with a little garlic and fresh herbs, and serve that potato tian on the side. If you didn't overdo the tomatoes in the tian, I think it'd go together very nicely. I'd use a firm-fleshed white fish, maybe bass or something; I wouldn't want it to weep excessively or flake all over the place.
I'd have to do some digging, but I think potatoes and tomatoes are often combined in the south of France, in Provence and thereabouts. Somewhere I even read about a kind of potato variant on ratatouille; the potatoes were par-cooked (of course) and sliced, I think instead of eggplant, and interleaved with zucchini and tomato and so forth. I believe there was even a thyme-scented tomato fondue ladled over the top before long baking.   Yes -- turns out that both eggplant...
I'll check him out. I know what you you mean about videos with bad technique. My personal favorite: look up videos on "how to debone a chicken." With the notable exception of Jacques Pépin, of course, pretty much every video shows how to break down a chicken, not how to take the bones out. I'm also starting a regular column focused on knife techniques using mostly an usuba, and in doing research on videos, I've noticed that there are very, very few good demo videos with an...
After reading a number of essays and interviews with Mrs. Child, I have come to the conclusion that she sort of undermined herself on this. She wrote the text of Mastering the Art so thoroughly and clearly that a lot of people just use it as a recipe-book. That wasn't her plan at all: she was trying to explain the logic behind these dishes, so that in the future you could execute them without recipes. I think this is why she responded so nastily to Julie Powell's blog...
What bugs me about your query, @slicer 333 , is that someone teaching knife skills shouldn't be doing this. It's bad technique. As @Danslice says, there are reasons why people might cheat this way, and I'm not going to fault them: I don't know their situation and so forth. But it's clearly not the right way, and it seems to me you should be teaching the right way, not how some people get by.
I've had îles flottantes and don't love them much either, to be honest. When I get to France and eat you out of house and home, I will certainly sharpen your knives, but I think perhaps we will also make a better dessert than poached meringue!
On the whole, yes, extra-virgin olive oil is not ideal for high-heat applications. And yes, there is a lot of "extra-virgin" that isn't anything of the kind.   To my mind, the reason to use extra-virgin in any given situation is that you like how it ultimately tastes. If you're cooking hot enough that its nutrients break down and it starts to denature, it's also not going to taste great. For that kind of cooking, I'd prefer another fat: canola oil is my go-to, but...
This particular plate isn't very good, but the concept is right.   Simply put, the front corners are used for accents: wasabi, gari (pickled ginger), etc. The middle-ground is for the food itself. The rear area is for building up elevation, to present a kind of landscape.   This is easier to imagine if you think of sashimi. You've got various little mounds and arranged shapes, gently filling the space. As you get farther back, they're leaning against or climbing up the...
I deleted the photo because I'm drooling. You rotten b&5@$*d! 
All knives need sharpening. What's your plan on that? Whatever that might be, it'll help give some recommendations.
New Posts  All Forums: