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Posts by ChrisLehrer

The point about sharpening with a Minosharp is very well taken, Chinacats. Fortunately, elementary high-quality sharpening is not difficult to learn, and the Japanese carbon knives will reward those who try -- they sharpen easily and enjoyably. And a decent 1k King stone is both cheap and a terrific place to start sharpening.
An oldie but a goodie. Perhaps my favorite question.   A. Assuming you are not doing something exceedingly unusual, by Anglo/American/French/Australian/Spanish/Italian standards, the sort of basic minimum set of knives is as follows:   Chef's knife -- 8"-10" -- does 90% of the work Paring/petty knife -- for detail work of various kinds Bread knife, serrated -- because crusty bread eats normal edges   In fact, you don't need a bread knife, but the $1 cheapie you pick...
A warning about seasoned carbon steel: if you are using an electric range, you may have some problems, depending on the design of the pan and the range. The problem is that the heat doesn't lick up the sides.
I think Julia was in Jacques's camp, as am I. But her recipes were so extraordinarily well-tested and -written that she got turned into Ms. Recipe. In the end, it all comes down to technique: can you pick up ingredients, know your way around what is at least usually done with them, and go ahead and execute without constantly looking at some book or other? Cookbooks are wonderful, but if you're bound to them they become traps. Cookbooks are most useful when you're free of...
I am delighted to help anyone who uses Tove Jansson images! So...   The price tag, based on Globals, is in the mid-high $100s, with an upper limit around let's say just over $200. (This is US$, and you can make the conversion if you like.)   If you use carbon skillets and such, you are more than obsessive-compulsive enough to go with carbon steel, which helps immensely. All things being equal (which they never are, admittedly), you get more bang for your buck...
Hi,   You are basically looking for a truly good chef's knife (or Japanese gyuto, which is the same thing).   What's your budget?   You have a sense of sharpening, and its importance, so I let that go. The remainder of your kit is good, so I let that go too. But if you're going to buy a life-altering knife, it will cost you. Global is almost certainly NOT the way to go. But let's get some basics clear.   Beyond money, how fussy / pernickety / OCD /...
Not precisely. The principle is sort of right, but not really.   You can sharpen any double-beveled knife to any level of asymmetry you like, fairly easily. The question is whether you gain anything and what, if anything, you lose.   The more asymmetrical the grind, the more transverse pressure on the edge. With hard steel, this is a fairly trivial issue, but with soft steel it's major. Basically the transverse pressure on soft steel means that the edge crushes fast and...
How much are you willing to spend, grand total? What do you currently use as your main "anchor" knife in the kitchen? Do you sharpen, and how?   Slicing sashimi can be anything from hack-and-hew to performance art, and the knife you use will be part of that. A santoku is not, on the whole, a good choice, but there are certainly worse ones. If you are thinking that this is a good knife because it's a Japanese design, think again: the Japanese home cook who cuts...
In no particular order -- or anyway, not one I'm wedded to for more than 3 minutes at a stretch:   Kyoto, Japan Bourg-en-Bresse, France Paris, France Florence, Italy Barcelona, Spain
I continue to think that some serious food historian will one day investigate closely the reception of Pepin and Child. It seems to me, largely anecdotally, that Julia Child got received as precisely what she did not want to be: a purveyor of great recipes that work great even if you don't know anything. She wanted to teach people to cook French; she became, much against her will, the first of the crowd of "TV cooks" who produced recipes for scratch-cooking that you...
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