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Posts by eastshores

What temp is your oil? I'm feeling like it might be low. Also how are you timing your cooking? A chicken tender is a piece of muscle next to the breast. Cutting breasts into strips unless you are careful is going to create uneven thickness and those are not chicken tenders. Here's a diagram     I'd call them chicken "fingers" since you are using breast. Pat them dry, then dredge and into a 350 oil bath.. Should work. It's not complicated, keep the moisture off the...
After reading again about poke weed.. that is a bit scary! The poison saturation in the plant varies based on the maturity of the plant. So you can't be sure after three purges that the toxins are gone. And they are some nasty toxins, including hemoglobin toxins. No thanks! I'd certainly never try to serve that to someone and I wouldn't gamble on it myself.
This sounds like your chicken is the problem. First, and no offense but let's make sure you are not battering and frying frozen chicken tenders? I only say that because the amount of moisture that is present in a typical frozen chicken tender will absolutely blow off any breading because of the steam generated during cooking. Your remark that it shrinks during cooking is also a dead giveaway of way too much moisture being lost during the fry.   You can buy frozen tenders...
 Thanks I'm actually quite familiar with both. The downside to heart of palm is it kills the tree and you get very little yield. I don't have a lot of sable palms on my land either, and it is fairly illegal to go tromping around on public land killing trees. There are probably some farms so I'll definitely investigate that. My father was a true Florida cracker, born in his grandmothers home and so poor at times growing up that eating heart of palm, squirrel, and wild birds...
Thanks cheflayne, I ordered the book, it looks great. I don't get up to Gainesville too often since it's about a 2.5 hour drive but it sounds like a fun road trip. I've found one thing that looks exciting but I will have to wait until the spring. Some call it cossacks asparagus. It's the tender new shoots from the Cattail plant that grows around wetlands. I live walking distance from a lake connected to the St. John's River. From what I see online it looks very tender and...
Phatch I agree completely. Take chicken, lamb, goat, or cattle - they are almost universally included in some variation in the diet of people world wide that partake in eating meat. Sure places that are close to abundant fish resources may include more fish in their diet. In my mind I wasn't suggesting that we could sustain ourselves entirely off of food sourced of indigenous ingredients. Instead, what it seems to me is that with so many possibilities, so much resource at...
I recently watched a program that featured Rene Redzepi whom is the chef of Noma   This really changed my perception of food and what I should be doing with it. Culturally we grow up with certain foods and food related traditions. They become commonplace to us. For me as a child born in the late seventies in the US this meant we already had mass market foods - processed foods, trans-fats galore, ingredients flown in from all of the place regardless of season. Not to...
A favorite of mine to go with salmon has always been cous cous. It's a pasta, but the texture is finer than rice so it is light and fluffy. I usually cook it in an herb infused stock. Another favorite to go with it being that it is a fatty fish is a tomato cucumber salad with a vinaigrette. The acid helps cut the fat and the crisp cool cucumbers are a nice texture.
Been missing my dad some so I'm making one of his favorite and simple foods, filling the house with those familiar aromas brings a little comfort. It's just cubed steaks with a hard sear, then sliced onions sweated then beef stock and covered to simmer for a few hours and make the steaks fork tender. Will thicken the stock into a light gravy and serve with some garlic bread.
 Don't be so quick to dismiss this. Maintaining a temp of 140F in a water bath for 72 hours doesn't require that the heating element be on all the time, just as keeping your refrigerator or freezer at temp doesn't require constant power. I know it seems strange. Just maybe give it a chance until you've had properly cooked sous vide meat and then make a decision.
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