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Posts by KateW

I agree it will take practice to know what works best. When I started my first job as a cook (the job I have right now) I had no idea how long everything would take so I didn't know how to prioritize. Once you know exactly where everything is, how long it will take to do everything, what you can kind of "forget about" for a while (not literally) while you move onto something else, and what things you can multitask, it will be a lot easier. It took me at least a month to...
Again this is a lot to do with what they want you to know. Off the top of my head I can come up with many. Wet: Poaching, steaming, boiling, simmering. Dry: Roasting, grilling, sauteing, frying, deep frying, broiling, baking. Combination: Stewing, braising. Then there are miscellaneous as cheflayne mentioned but I don't think they would be included as cooking techniques in a curriculum.
Egullet has made some changes in the last couple months and I no longer go there. They have become less about people and more about food and while there is nothing wrong with that if you really want to become a serious food site, that's just not the place for me. Just a heads up, if that is not the place for you as well.
I think when I asked this question-- I believe it was here, a couple years ago-- I could not find it in Google either. The answers vary. My problem was, the chef asked us as sort of a take-home question, so I could not ask him, either! The answer does depend on what they want you to know. Each school, even each chef, will tell you something different. Find out the answer your particular chef wants to know. :D
At most colleges they definitely treat people like money. They overbook the dorms and make people sleep co-ed in the rec room in bunk beds while they sort things out. They drag their feet on placing you in internships and make you feel like an idiot when you show up to the student services office and ask where the **** you might be going next week--"Oh we placed you in England--didn't anyone tell you? Call this number..." They tell you your project is due on this date...
I'm 25. Is that what you meant by young? :D
Don't forget demiglace.
Thanks for the advice--I was talking to one of my co-workers the other day and he said a couple people will be leaving in the next month or so, plus business always picks up in the winter, so I may be getting hours soon. Plus he says the boss and my coworkers are noticing that I'm good at what I do, and while that won't get me a raise if I don't ask, they may think of me first when they need someone to fill in. A lot of the cooks goof around too much or are just slackers...
Nobody's been in this position before? Hmm...
You may remember me from my cooking school blog, and some accounts of my internship/current job at a racing track. I really like it there but it has become less of a challenge and also not enough money now that I am newly married and considering children and a house (or at least a better apartment) in the next few years. I know cooks as a rule don't tend to get paid much but I also know some cooks where I am working get paid more than I do--not sure how much more though....
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