or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Neeps

Most of their salads seem to be dressed with mayo. The Ukrainians that I know refer to salat olivier as diced boiled potatoes with pickles, peas, boiled eggs, and sausage or boiled meat and mayonnaise garnished with dill or parsley. Another popular one is the layered salad "shouba" that has diced boiled potatoes, onions, pickled herring, boiled grated beets with dill. And one I can't remember the name but love is with boiled grated beets, walnuts, dill and pickles. I...
I have the best thing for that: a kitchen island with 2 bar stools on the other side. If people offer help I sit them down with a drink and give them prep. Or they can just sit and watch, I actually love the company, they can chatter away without a problem. Though I don't really mind if someone wants to come on "my side", though that usually means that I have to adjust to them, which is okay, I usually manage to make it fun. The only one I enjoy having on the kitchen...
Well, before the Ukrainian better half creates a profile just to correct this: For Ukrainians, there is no pierogi, there is pelmeni (filling wrapped in dough), Pirozhki (baked or fried filled buns). :) Anyways, tradition goes that when hubby was a kid, men, usually, would assemble at one's house to make huge batches of these. The woman of the house would make the dough and the fillings, and keep bringing them at the table for the group to assemble while they chat and...
It's been pointed out to me that this post could be taken funny by someone who doesn't know where I'm coming from or has a different sense of humor. So voila! Gone. :smoking:
That's exactly how I view these meals--a tasting, not a feeding. It's what I tell friends who bi*&% incessantly about how little and expensive the food was at one place or another, that sometimes it's just about tasting.
I'll always remember how a coq au vin actually made my husband hurl :D I think we were on a series of bad luck for food when we went to France, and that that infamous coq au vin was just the last straw for him. I think he's suspicious of french cooking now... his face was also a sickly shade of green when we were served andouillette :p
Thanks to both of you! The thread has been up for a week, I was starting to wonder if anyone ate pho at all :) I'll be trying with pork, steamed, and processed while slightly frozen. I've got the broth down so good, it would be a shame not to figure out the meatballs. You brave with the pho? Tendons etc?
So I went on a pho making escapade, which is the type of thing that happens when you move to the cow-subarb from the heart of Vancouver--you gotta learn how to make all the Asian specialties you've grown to love. The broth turned out AMAZING--beef broth, just bones over night , then a couple hours with roasted ginger, garlic and onion with anise, cinnamon and clove. Splash of fish sauce at the end. Looks, tastes and smells pretty close to the real deal. However the pho...
First things first, the absolute bare bones would be things that are multi-functional and the must haves if you are a)time restricted till proper shopping b)between paychecks c)moving and half-packed/unpacked d)a minimalist. ;) -bowls -cutlery -big sharp knife (see, there's your home security too) -frying pan -cups -aluminum foil -corkscrew -Banana stand Next step: -whisk -scissors -wooden spoons -slotted spoon -ladle -measuring cups/spoons -tongs -spatula -glasses,...
thanks for the info, ended up making salsa and then chile sauce instead fo hotsauce for a safer acid/sweet content. The chile sauce turned out sooooo goooood...
New Posts  All Forums: