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Posts by ChefBillyB

Logistics is the name of the game. Every catering is different and as you found out this year you learn quick. If I were doing this catering and in most cases it does depend on the main entrees I'm serving, I would do things in stages. I would send a crew to set up, then have a few come back for the appetizer's. I would then follow with my cooks with the main meal. Like I said this does depend on my entree. If I was doing a prime rib and it could stay in a warmer longer...
20 Liters is about 6 1/4 gal. Make it in a stand up mixer. If your mixer looks to be to small then do half at a time. If a paddle doesn't work then use a dough hook. If that doesn't work then get your least favorite cook or prep person to do it by hand. The most important part of any roux is making sure every particle of flour is mixed with the butter or fat. Now for my question? What the Hell do you need that much Roux for ??????
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Koukouvagia's recipe covers all the bases, I also agree on the amount heat. I remember making chili in one of my food services. After rendering the ground beef you can throw some flour into the dripping so as to act like a roux for a thickening agent. I never tried using the corn flour (Masa Harina) at this point of the recipe. I do add chopped onions when I'm browning the meat and green peppers also work well.
imho, it's not that big of a deal to have a tray of fish ready to be dipped into a batter. If the batter needs to be made more often, then so be it. The fish filets or chunks can be on a try along with the batter in the reach-in or walk-in. This is a simple thing and doesn't need to be over thought. If this method can't be accomplished then look at doing a Salmon filet or some kind of fresh fish that may be available during lent. If a homemade batter dipped product can't...
I can't wait to see when all the love stops and someone looks at P&L. I can already hear someone saying the BOH labor needs to be cut by 25 to 50%......In many cases the people who worked their butts off to open a restaurant aren't around a year later.
The only thing I can add is make sure all the entrees are full of flavor. I remember my Father-in-law a few years back when he was in his 90's. He would like all the food we brought, but, he would love when we brought over super nachos. I think when you get older your taste buds aren't like they used to be. He loved the nachos because of all the different flavors and spices he was tasting. Don't be afraid of talking with the seniors. I will guarantee they will tell you...
I think your going to run into a lot of different kinds instructors. Some instructors will be happy to see a person like you with ambition and drive to be the best they could. Other instructors are just putting in the time, just follow the lesson plan and move on. I don't think you'll find all your instructors being game to help you out in this area. You will find a few, take advantage of them. First of all make sure your doing well in the structured part of the class....
I know many chefs on this site have had some conflicts with the health dept over the years. I always had a great relationship with many inspectors in lots of restaurants. In many cases I had inspectors calling me asking a question about a certain way to handle a food item. I may not have needed a lot of inspections in my kitchens but, I have seen many other kitchens in my town I wouldn't even set foot in. Calling the health dept on someone isn't going to close them down....
Calling the health dept is professional courtesy. You are calling a professional to teach the novices how to operate a restaurant without killing people in the process. This is much better than the health dept coming in after the hospital calls with 20 people getting Salmonella poisoning. I guess it's just a matter of how long you want the health dept to be notified. The keywords are " The owners don't speak English" 
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