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Posts by phatch

Those are fun. 
Lots of variables. But as a broad generalization, the meat should be at room temp before cooking.    Those commercials that talk about cooking from frozen are about selling their product and claiming convenience, but the quality is not as good as can be achieved in other methods.   Conversely, Cook's Illustrated recently claimed that cooking a frozen steak from frozen gave them results they liked better compared to a similar steak that had been frozen, thawed, then...
No, not to my knowledge. 
Remember when i talked about the liquid water content in cookies? Using a liquid oil will also cause a lot of spread. The flavor change wouldn't be to my liking. And you can't switch oil for butter in all cakes. Any cake made with the creaming method will not work well with oil because creaming is also a leavening action. You create air holes in the butter by dragging the sugar crystals through the butter.    I do sometimes make an olive oil substitution for butter in...
An article in the Washington posts explains the appeal of Indian food.   http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/03/03/a-scientific-explanation-of-what-makes-indian-food-so-delicious/   Executive summary: Western food tends to layer and blend similar flavors. Many Indian dishes have very little or no flavor overlap. The dishes with greater overlap were the starchier dishes with rice, breads and so on. 
But a scampi style sauce is not bad on pasta...
Mac is a good brand, though I don't know which particular knives those happen to be. It looks like the point was purposely taken off both blades and the edge, OH the EDGE on the left one. There's some rust pitting on that larger one as well.   They can be fixed, but it would be cheaper to buy new than to hire it out imho. If you're up to the task yourself and have the gear you can give it a try.  I suspect some of those wavy areas will always be a little weak and chippy...
I think  the fumes coming off that mortar and pestle could be very intense. 
I want to revisit the stuffed foie gras burger from a more technical standpoint. What doneness would try to achieve? Would you precook the foie gras? how thick would the foie gras be? How thick the entire burger? Would you use a leaner grind to counter the fattiness of the foie gras?  I've never had foie gras because I don't get along with liver that well. So these questions interest me as I have no idea how to approach such a burger. 
There are other ways to balance the equation of when to add the chicken. Where you're using breasts but may want to keep the meat in the sauce for longer in the cooking, then change the cut of chicken. Breast can't be cooked that long before becoming dry and stringy and losing its flavor. But if you use the dark meat from the leg, then it can take the longer cooking and offer deep satisfying flavor. Going further, keep it on the bone. You can remove the skin which doesn't...
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