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Posts by phatch

I have a commercial grade Burton single burner stand alone and a dished wok induction burner. Love them. 
It does have an interesting aesthetic, but the geometry of the blade section is poor.  There's a reason knives are thin in the blade.    Cleavers are rarely used by home cooks. It's almost purely a butchering tool. Those are thick as knives go, but still thinner than this and often convex ground like an axe head for pretty much all the same reasons an axe is shaped that way too.     The Asian style of thin cleaver knife for meat and vegetables, this is a poor design...
The installation pdf says it needs a 3/4 inch line for natural gas for this one burner.  http://www2.subzero-wolf.com/products/downloads/QRIM15.pdf  It takes up a big chunk of the cabinet underneath too.  You'd need multiple lines or a larger line for more burners if that's the path you want.   Note also the 30" minimum above the burner for cabinet or hood mount. That's higher than you'll often see for home gear.    Rule of thumb for venting is 100 BTUs of heat generated...
 This is true, but there are simple solutions to most of it. Peppers you can do under the broiler or with a torch. I agree it is less convenient.  The stove top grill, the cast iron grill /griddle or pans work well. With cast iron, you need to match the size of the pan to the burner as the poor conductivity of cast iron can make for a wildly unevenly heated pan.  For the pastry pan trick you just use the grill/griddle or large pan instead of directly on the burner. 
What sort of cleaver action do you want it do? As a Chinese chef's style cleaver, much too thick still. As a hacking cleaver for chicken bones, it's probably OK, but still not my preference in design. I can see fractures at that first step in the steel backing from bone work and it's still way too thick. For heavier bone work, I'm not qualified to give an informed opinion. I suspect the impact will fracture the blade away from the bamboo over time. Adhesives don't hold up...
The geometry doesn't impress me. Way too much wedging going on. 
Separates you have to deal with the extra space requirements which is a big hurdle for most home kitchens,  the extra cost of power/fuel, doubling up on venting and combining ducting  or going with a custom single construction for the vent    With the sort of venting you're likely to need there's an extra range of hassles. You'll be putting a lot CFM out of the house that has to be replaced. If it's done incorrectly, you can poison yourself with carbon monoxide from your...
You're not going to get a 20K gas burner without some extra work. You'll need a larger capacity  gas line to deliver that much fuel. This is not always possible. Also, you'll have to meet extra levels of construction, fire proofing, and maybe fire suppression to have that strong of a burner via gas. Venting is also something that is given extra requirements with high output gas that you'll have to meet. For what you want, you'd probably be better served with separate...
I cut a New York into thirds horizontally, and sliced up some pork sirloin into thin cutlets. Season with adobo, pepper, lime juice on both sides, let stand 10 -15 minutes.   Sear them off. Meanwhile prep the avocado, beans tomato, buns and the condiments.    Steak--barros luco--on the left for my wife, pork --lomito palta-- on the right for me. Yeah, not a great shot, but it was delicious!  
It depends on your goals as a cook or a video producer.   Overall,  I think it's highly reasonable for a video oriented guide to measure, or at least pre-measure. For a casual cook, eyeballing is likely to lead to waste and consuming more oil than they should. Experienced cooks really aren't the target market.    Most of the people producing videos really aren't as experienced as the common poster here at cheftalk in my opinion. 
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