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Posts by phatch

If it helps, the owner of New West told me he's used this particular design for processing elk before. 
Basically, our physical dimensions dictate the heights of things we find comfortable. Toast tends to fall from the surfaces at a slow speed. The slow speed drop from the surface means a particular rate of spin. Since the height of tables, counters, carried plates is all pretty close, the toast can't rotate far enough in that height to avoid landing on the buttered side.    Well, at least I thought the analysis was interesting but I'm a nerdy person....
This is a woods kitchen it sounds like. More in the lines of Horace Kephart, or Nessmuk, cookery.
You sound like the kind of person who would like a particular set of knives from New West Knifeworks.      http://www.newwestknifeworks.com/product/kitchen-knives--fusionwood-20-line/chopper-chef-knife-fusionwood-20-/3563   I've used one. It's well built, sharp. Not my preference in a cooking blade, but where you want something with some ulu-like tendencies, this seems to be a good match. They have a smaller one too, but it's too small imho.    This might be on...
 It's not about correct or incorrect really. Santoku have blades usually in the 6-8 inch range, much like the utility knives do. Or to call it a petty can reduce the size to the 5-7 inch range in many people's definitions. So it struck me (and my biases and preferences) as wanting two knives that have basically the same function. And so you could bump up your budget on the remaining blades and get better tools.  To me, it's about blade length and minimal belly-- a French...
At the 1 pound level, it starts to approximate my 2x as much flour by volume as fat. 1 pound of butter is 2 cups. 1 pound of flour is 3-4 cups depending on measuring technique--always the peril of volume measurements.  At the tablespoon level, the differences are less marked.
My Advieh Adventure from 2004       I've never used this spice mix since. I'll have to look into it again. 
Do it by Volume.   But roux is more flexible than that really. Equal volume is simplest to make and to mix in. However, i routinely use about 2x as much flour as fat just to reduce the fat I'm consuming. The flour has the thickening power, the fat just helps it cook evenly and mix in more evenly. This thicker roux clumps up as you cook it out, particularly for the lighter colored roux you use for bechamel. This is trickier to mix in smoothly to the milk and I sometimes...
You're probably getting a clog in the sprayer. Citrus has sugars and other dissolved solids which will dry and clog up the sprayer. This is probably a better tool for someone spraying much more often than you seem to. 
They could both be right depending how you placed them. If they weren't right next to each other, it would be pretty easy to have a 20 degree variation in a conventional oven.    If you're going to do the water trick, put the thermometers in a zip locking bag to keep the water out of them. 
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