or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by phatch

For the amount you need to color tzatziki, you probably wouldn't notice the flavor. But I also would choose a different plate to the let the tzatziki just be what it is.    If you're willing to tilt the flavor for it's own purpose, then you have a few other options to consider.   Saffron--this is not out of place in a meal that would include tzatziki, but will bring it's own flavor into play.  Depends a bit what you're serving this with to choose saffron.    Achiote...
Cheesecake, pies, maybe the sweet potato rolls. Start the bread drying for the stuffing
The juice is used too. So having the right salt balance makes sense to me.
Bubble wrap under the place mat. They make reflective insulating varieties as well. Look in home depot for it. Incorporate it into the base of some chargers perhaps for a more stylish approach. Alternatively, you could preheat the spots with bowls of hot water or such.
Some thoughts on Asian Technique and food philosophy   Knife skills are very similar across the cuisines to my thinking and limited experience. The cleavers of Asia are really more chef knives in thickness and cutting ability, with other knives for hacking bones and such. The cleaver style offers some advantages for cuts more common in Asian food than Western food. The high sides help with thin planking cuts and batons/batonnet. Chinese cuisine takes this a step further...
There is a range of techniques and some overlap of course.    The cuisines I'm weakest  on are Korean, Japanese and Thai.    The Kimchi Chronicles by Marja Vongerichten (Jean Georges wife). The PBS series for this book was also quite good. Funny to see Hugh Jackman, and the Vongericthens cooking together, but they live in the same building.    China, you should look at these authors:    Grace Young Eileen Yin Fei Lo-- Many books, none of them bad. Some overlapping...
You've got  most of a gumbo there, or some similar braises.   You could go a number of asian directions in stir fries, soups and similar treatments. 
While true, you must also remember the thrust of the original post of food forum and blogs now.  Chowhound almost always comes up in my food searches as does epicurious. I've used both as research points, but I don't visit them for current discussion and as a routine information feed on the topic. So certainly useful, but not what I would recommend for best daily reading on food topics. For values of what I find to be interesting daily reading.  The exception for that rule...
I bake directly in a silicone pan and gave up on the springform. If you wrap the springform in foil, you can usually keep the water out.
I don't drink, so this is just what I've seen recommended. Depends somewhat on the seasoning beyond the smoke,but usually the more the flavor deviates from it's baseline profile, the more often I see Gewurztraminer recommended. Sometimes an Italian Prosecco. Most often with barbecue, it is beer though.    I listened to an NPR piece on "flats", an aged non-carbonated beer that can be quite pricey, but might be something worth looking into further for that beerish aspect,...
New Posts  All Forums: