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Posts by phatch

Za'atar and Sumac Turkey   Sumac has a lovely lemon flavor and is the qualifying ingredient for the challenge. It also has a lot of readily soluble red color so it tends to make for well browned skin.   I've been cooking turkey in parts the last few years. I like the speed and control it offers for removing light or dark meat when done separately from the other. Easier to carve too.    Thighs finished about 30 minutes before the breast. So on to a plate and off to...
I think more as in scalloped potatoes than in sea scallops
I like it with cheese. It's not the tradition, but it works for me. Aged asiago would be my first choice. The Greek guy who catered my wedding had a dish he served in his restaurant he called pasta mykonos. Scallops, shrimp, pasta a buttery cream sauce, garlic and lemon. And asiago. Heavenly.
What method, what result? There's plenty of approaches. Tell us more about what you're trying to do. 
I've done the oil spread between two balls for rolling peking pancakes. I'll have to try it here and with hot instead of boiling. 
I used the boiling water method. Just watched a video where he only used warm water. His were thick too but seemed to have abetter texture.
I've made these before and enjoyed them. Tonight I used a frozen brand from Thailand. Mikely Food Company. They were better than the ones from scratch. Thin crispy exterior and a flaky interior. Mine have been bready in comparison. Thoughts?
Most people have inadequate knives because they're not aware of what it will do for them to have better gear. Nor that sharpening doesn't have to be complex or expensive although it can be as well. And there are people who just don't cook beyond subsistence feeding of themselves.    They never learned to chop vegetables, or disassemble a whole chicken. They muddle through and think that's just how it has to be.    Clearly you're a tool geek so it matters to you. And...
I've toyed with something I called Basic Beef Oomph. Haven't played with it in years though. I guess it was a phase in my cooking development.    It was based in dried powdered mushrooms, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, seasoned with some onion powder and garlic powder. As I recall. There might have been some other things.    Better technique and understanding replaced my interest in that effort. Still some seasoning tricks I use now and then to correct something that's...
The Great Cuisines of the world have all been peasant food. What the commoner prepared and ate. Sure, fancy court food shows up in feasts and such but is really an oddity more than a baseline of the cuisine.    Chinese, Indian, Greek, Italian, French, Mexican and all is about the eating of the commoner. Michelin stars are quite far removed from this imho. They're more elite performances and innovations. Think the Olympic Games. But does that mean the corner playground...
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