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Posts by phatch

Unscrew wood or plastic handles if it has any. Flaxseed oil is ideal, but others will work too.
Probably nonstick. I can't recommend non stick for a wok
A specific recommendation:       Forschner 10" bread knife. This is an inexpensive, ordinary blade steel bread knife. I like it because it is THIN (profile and geometry benefits) compared to other good bread knives. Since the serrations are ground in from one side only, bread knives fall into the chisel grind category. This makes them "steer" in the cut unless you have good technique. The steering makes your cuts uneven. Being thin, the Forschner minimizes the...
The Kitchen Sessions was also very good on video. Worth watching the DVDs if you can find them. You'll see a lot of good technique, plating and more. 
There's an egg liaison variation that really lets you melt in more cheese without breaking the sauce. It's my favorite, but it's more work. I usually just use a mornay approach, but when I really want a great mac and cheese, I break out the eggs.    Alton Brown has a version of this online. Various editions of Joy of Cooking have a very similar recipe as does Cook's Illustrated.    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/stove-top-mac-n-cheese-recipe.html
Steel snobbery is something to watch out for imho. The differences at this level are mostly incremental and small, not revolutionary or huge. The greater differences come out of heat treatment, profile and geometry. And even then, in the Japanese laser market, they're more similar than they are different.    Once you get above about 62 in hardness, sharpening is a whole new ballgame as well. And while the jig systems you mention are capable of sharpening these steels,...
Jasper White is a master of seafood. I wouldn't characterize his dishes as particularly French though. He's written some books and has been a guest chef on countless cooking shows. Check youtube probably.    As far as a total cuisine approach to seafood, I think the Chinese are probably my favorite.  Simple approaches, respectful of the ingredient as well as a variety likely unequaled anywhere else with so many salted and dried varieties as well.    For example, a...
Scratches in the patina are common in a carbon wok. Especially just up from the lower areas where the heat is not as intense. Further, with the less intense heat, moisture from the food and sauces has more opportunity to weaken the patina making it more prone to scratch.   I have a flat bottom carbon steel wok that I mostly use on my induction burner. I seasoned it originally over gas and had a good dark patina well up the sides. With use on the induction burner that has...
If it helps, the owner of New West told me he's used this particular design for processing elk before. 
Basically, our physical dimensions dictate the heights of things we find comfortable. Toast tends to fall from the surfaces at a slow speed. The slow speed drop from the surface means a particular rate of spin. Since the height of tables, counters, carried plates is all pretty close, the toast can't rotate far enough in that height to avoid landing on the buttered side.    Well, at least I thought the analysis was interesting but I'm a nerdy person....
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