or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by phatch

I made this earlier this week so I suppose it doesn't technically count, but here it is anyway.   Braised Chinese Omelet       If I were making this for one or two people, I'd do it differently. Build the sauce, keep hot. Make the omelet disks,  stir fry the filling, roll, sauce, serve--no braising/simmering step.   But when cooking for the whole family I make the disks, fry the filing, roll, assemble in a skillet, make the sauce and pour over, simmer until hot...
I'm a fan of cocobolo. I like the color, warmth, depth and grain. It's fairly oily so is suitable for kitchens.  African blackwood is good in its natural state for kitchen knife use, but I think it's kind of boring as wood goes.    I also like spalted maple or birch but this is usually stabilized (resin injection for stability/strength). Similarly, buckeye burl, ironwood, snakewood are beautiful, but usually are stabilized. 
Bladeforums had this discussion on PA knife  makers in 2007.  http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/482356-Custom-knife-makers-in-Pennsylvania. I suspect those people will mostly still be in business. Many woodworkers in your area could do it as well. If you want some of the various composite materials then the woodworker should have respirator equipment.    If you have some basic equipment, you could take on the task yourself. Pick up some scale material from...
The difference in oven temperature (375-400) in the two recipes is within the margin of error of most ovens. Generally, you get more crispness/crust with the high heat finish, but its very easy to burn with the high sugar content of the marinade so watch it closely.    I favor a two rack approach. On a lower rack, put a large rimmed baking sheet with 1/2 an inch or so of water in it. lay the pork directly on the upper rack. This lets the char shiu cook more evenly on all...
The amount  of iron leached is greatly overstated in most of the reports.    Sure we like clad stainless steel. But there are things cast iron will do that stainless generally does not. You might not have lived through the blackening craze for example which really only works on cast iron because of its very high thermal capacity. Similarly it crusts steaks better than stainless steel.    It's not that cast iron is better than stainless steel. It's that its another tool...
There are a number of threads on sharpening. Most people here will recommend you learn to sharpen free hand and likely on natural stones.    If you want to handle it more simply, there are a few machines from Chef's Choice that will put an acceptable edge on your blade. However, they tend to sharpen aggressively so your knife will wear faster over all compared to other techniques.    Jig systems are also available, the Edge Pro is the pinnacle of these. This tends to...
Blast it in the pan, finish in the oven, build a reduction sauce while it rests. Boar_D_Laze has written on this a couple of times as I recall, see post #4 below.         If you want to cheat a little bit, pick up some demi base. More Than Gourmet should have their tubs available in your area. Quality is OK, but they're pricey though. http://www.morethangourmet.com/pantry-stock-sauces-gourmet-soups/meat-based-sauces-a-stocks/french-demi-glace
Finding a block that fits a variety of wide blades such as your multiple chefs and santoku is difficult. It gets harder when you have 10" knives or longer as well.    I really wish the "Kapoosh" line of knife blocks supported 10" blades. It's very versatile. But it's only 8" deep.
Forschner will do the job in your price range as well.  12" rosewood handle: http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-12-Inch-Bread-Rosewood-Handle/dp/B0019WSJQU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1406552979&sr=8-2&keywords=forschner+12%22+bread+knife   or 14"  with fibrox handle: http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-40642-Slicer-Fibrox-Handle/dp/B000EYWNLG/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1406553024&sr=8-4&keywords=forschner+14%22+bread+knife   At these lengths and with the chisel grind and somewhat...
 Molcajete should work for ground toasted rice. I just use a cheap propeller style coffee grinder for this and other spice grinding. It shows up as a garnish in Thai, Vietnamese and Chinese dishes. Probably Malaysian, Cambodian and other related cuisines too.  Here's one common Thai dish with toasted ground rice: http://wanderingchopsticks.blogspot.com/2008/12/larb-larp-laab-laap-lao-thai-ground.html Yes, you have it right for forcemeats. Use it as the filler or even the...
New Posts  All Forums: