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Posts by MeatPie

If you're an Aussie, don't you mean bigpond (Telstra)?
Don't you just love the smell of dollars in the morning.... :D
Thank you so much for your advice which is invaluable - including yours LWP which merely indicates a different way of doing things. I admit I was encouraged to read this: I have done this! :peace: And I make sabayons most days as it is :thumb: Phew. "The" day is Wednesday. Thanks heaps again.
Where I work there is a strict dileanation between cookery chefs and pastry chefs. (This is actually quite refreshing given that a lot of kitchens I've been in mix the two). Normally, never the twain meet. You even so much as get caught sniffing in the direction of the pastry area you get shafted :lol: Here, before you start pastry you have to do your commercial certificate in cookery. (In that certificate you do do a few modules in pastry such as cakes, hot and cold...
ChefPeon, I LOVE LOVE LOVE your website! :peace: As for Challah (which I make regularly) I have never used butter in it. Depending on who's eating, I'll use one of the two below: 2 eggs at room temperature, 1-1/2 cups water 1/4 cup Olive Oil extra virgin 2 Tbs. Sugar (granulated) 2 tsp. salt 2 cups whole wheat flour 2-1/2 cups bread flour 1-1/2 tsp instant yeast Poppy seeds OR 6 oz sugar (granulated) 1 oz salt 4 oz olive oil 12 oz egg yolks...
Cupcakes were always in America. It's just that they were usually relegated to kids' parties (as they should be! *s*) Then a few bakeries got a hold of them and made them hip and the usual food fad followed. Same thing applies to croissants etc. You can try to "educate" the American palate but culture is what it is and if a culture rejects a certain style then so be it. I kind o' like the fact that in America just because it's French doesn't mean it has to be that way....
And you will have customers who will buy elsewhere. Over here, there is a preference for brown but not burnt. I've not seen pastries the colour of rosewood in Paris boulangeries either.
In my experience, the person with an apprenticeship will do better than both. Before I entered the industry as a tradie, I was part of the hiring team in a hotel. Of the applicants that we did hire, I found it very interesting to note that it was those without the degrees actually lasted.
In your present position, wanting to go to college? It won't work. If you continue working and volunteer in a kitchen? It can. Really, you don't need to attend college. Personally, I think it's a waste of time but can understand why it has revered status in the US. Confounds me why that is but I understand. It's just about prioritising. Oh, and it's okay to be angry. I look at the conditions in the US in terms of starting out and I cringe. You guys really do have it...
Yes. If you want it, you can have it. In Australia, training is run via an apprenticeship scheme. After an indentured period - usually three or four years - you are then given your trade papers which qualifies you as a chef. Some people say you can't be a chef until you run a kitchen. They're usually the ones who don't understand what a brigade is and where the name 'chef' comes from and actually means. Over here, 'cook' tends to mean unqualified as in no apprenticeship...
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