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Posts by The Tourist

Look, I understand your impatience. I've never met the woman, I haven't the foggiest idea how big her hand is, nor did I see the original knife(s). Most of the info I have is one face-to-face meeting with the doctor about the incident, and one voice mail. In a nutshell he reports she liked the mundane seven-inch western handled gyuto and "won't give it back." Now he wants four more for gifts. Yikes, I gave him a loaner. And when I say "loaner" I actually mean a...
LOL, no prob. There's a story you should know. Back when cities had huge walls around them, a church elder was out riding his horse and noticed an strange man sitting by the town gate. He wasn't begging, but he wasn't doing much else, either. The elder stopped to question the individual. "You sir," the elder yelled down from horseback, "What is your business here?" Traveler stood and responded, "My liege, I am balladeer, a minstrel, a harlequin, a wayfarer. I...
Oh, I agree with you 100%. One of the best sword polishers in the western hemisphere lives right here in Madison, Wisconsin. People wait for over two years for his work. I am referring to the perception of knives and sharpening. And frankly, we misperceive a great deal. The woman in question is older, and my guess is that any trinkets she saved from pre-war Japan have an intrinsic value most don't understand. (I live in a section of the country called "tornado...
Ray, you may not know this, but I'm a knife sharpener. And I take pride in my work. My initial comment was just a bit of levity. I expected the usual morning crowd to come here and excoriate me over our wake-up coffee. I do think that all tinkers are cut from the same cloth. I notice that you report he uses the humorous epithet "honemeister." I use terms like highwayman, cutpurse or horse thief. The idea is the same. Going to see a tinker should be an enjoyable...
It struck me at first, but placed in context I'm not surprised. When I first went public trying to establish a route I went to the sushi places, some upscale chains in my area called "Edo," and even our Ginza of Tokyo. I figured if it was a Japanese restaurant it would have Japanese knives, which went dull and needed a guy who could sharpen in that fashion. First I found that most of these guys sharpen their own stuff. In the culinary schools they attended knife...
Well, you're very lucky, indeed. We have a guy in my area, and I sometimes believe he works for the mafia. I have to admit, I never met a sharpener or a tinker I had any respect for!!! What a bunch of unmitigated low lifes. Yikes, they rub steel with a wet rock and yet they have bigger egos than Britney Spears' bikini waxer! If there ever was a morality vortex on two legs it has to be a tinker! I wouldn't let one these crooks within ten feet of my wife. You're...
Frankly, I am not ready for Shaptons yet. Let me explain. I'm a good tinker, but I am not a polisher and I am not Dwade Hawley (who polishes hospital microtomes). Anytime any of us need something 5 to 10K we can get that level using traditional stones and glass/paste. I even have a 12K 3x9 stones I use primarily for the obverse sides of Japanese asymmetrical slicing knives. (Sorry for the generality, BDL, I was more interested in a "word picture.") In the trade...
I appreciate the sentiment, it's not something I've ever done before. About as close as I came was talking to a Sansei (third generation Japanese American) chef who finished his culinary school training back in Japan. His concern was that I get him knives that were "Japanese" and "better than he had." He was tickled to death one night when I loaned him a 'clad' knife... But discern a real-deal knife for a woman born and raised in Japan? Yikes, that's way over my...
Thanks for the reply. I might have a patchwork, stop-gap answer for immediate needs, but that's not a permanent answer. Along with my weekly order, I bought this knife for his mom to use if all else fails: 6" Damascus Koyanagiba Sushi Knife - Shigeki - The Japan Woodworker Catalog I do appreciate your research here. The underlying issue is that my comfort and ultimate education is the minor concern. In a nutshell, his mom has had "real" kitchen...
As many of you know I loaned a rather mundane Japanese wa-gyuto to my doctor, a Nisei. Briefly, his mother was born and raised in Japan and came here after WWII. She brought with her generation's old real-deal kitchen knives. Several months ago these knives were shipped back to Japan for polishing by a togishi, and lost or stolen. I simply ran home, grabbed a mundane wa-gyuto that had a fresh edge to loan to the doctor until his knives were found or replaced. No...
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