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Posts by Chefross

If you're only using it for potatoes and nothing else, AND if you strain it at the end of service each and every day, you should be able to get 5-6 days out of it. A lot depends on fryer temperature and usage. Duck fat has a tendency to break down quickly at higher temperatures.   When using it for duck confit it can be re-used many times because it's cooked at a low temperature. Only experience will teach you how far you can go with this. Your eyes and nose will know...
I'll take a stab at this one:   When I ran a banquet house, sometimes someone would order Baked Alaska as dessert. I am used to it in quantity. I used sponge cake baked in sheet pans. I used a 4" biscuit cutter to cut out disks. I placed these on parchment lined sheet pans 15 per pan 3x5. Next we scooped out balls of vanilla ice cream and placed one on each disk. This now went into the freezer for 4-5 hours. I used regular meringue (egg whites, sugar, cream of tartar)...
Referring to the original post, I have never used that long thin metal stick (cake tester) to measure done-ness before, but I've seen it used and if you were used to it, and it works for you, all the better.   I have seen the kitchen life evolve through many years of working for different kinds of Chefs. Years ago, no one would think twice about wiping their knife on their apron or sharpening it on the corner of the counter. Using the "cake tester" as you call it...
An acquaintance of mine is of Lebanese descent and she authored a cookbook "Rosewater and Orange Blossoms" Her name is Maureen Abood. The recipes are about as authentic as you can get. I cooked along side her when she was a guest here at work. She is amazing. Check her out.
QUOTE: "I'm just curious If an established private chef would be up for a sous type of apprentice; whether paid, unpaid, or under the table (The later two making more sense because it wouldn't make you an employer), to assist in their daily purchasing, prep, service, cleaning, and other tasks (Particularly working with a family unit if they have kids and what not). I'm sure the pertainent details of business management and licencing aspects of the private chef's...
I am a private Chef, but before that I was in the industry for 35 years. That's 35 years of working in high volume, colleges, hospitals, hotels, banquets, restaurants, and the list goes on. As a private Chef you will be expected to be able to replicate different cooking styles, from different counties. You will be expected to be able to produce everything from hors d oeuvres, to pastries, and everything in between.   Where does all this knowledge come from you...
  Okay....I knew I'd get flack for this one. Everything you've all pointed out has merit, but it is predicated on the idea that the employee WANTS to be there to learn and grow. Thank you.My thoughts are with all of you, really they are, but experiences have shown me otherwise. I am the first one in line to agree on the screaming, yelling, physically abusive Chef. I was on the receiving end of that more than I want to remember.There is no room for this behavior...
Read the article. Couldn't disagree more. In the fairy tale world of "yes Chef" where all the employees have happy smiles and do their work diligently and in a fast manner, and never complain, yadda yadda...... The fact is those people are very few and very far between.  Respect the opinions of my cooks?In what world?Firstly the cooks have to know what they are talking about before I can respect an opinion Cooks like to know what's going on.It's none of their business....
Try European Imports and/or Karps....they have most of what you are looking for.
I have 3 varieties of squirrels to deal with. Black, grey and red, the red being the nastier of the 3.I get blue jays, piliated woodpeckers, downy and hairy. We are several months away from hummingbirds, but I enjoy the variety of birds that stop by.
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