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Posts by WillBkool

I ususally take an electric one burner hot plate, a skillet and a pot. I pre-marinate some meats and freeze them, and when I go on the road, I throw them in a cooler. I even pre-saute veggies, so that they only need to be heated. You can make almost anything you want like this, and it sure beats fast food. You got to be careful though so you don't set off the smoke alarm.   While I do like eating out at non fast food restaurants, it can get a little expensive.
First, you should tell us exactly what you want to do. If cooking, then culinary management, if general  food managing, then some kind of hospitality or restaurant management. My school has a culinary and hospitality management programs. About 3 or 4 of the classes overlap for both, but culinary goes into more cooking and hospitality goes into more of running a hotel or restaurant.   Here are the classes required, plus others like english, math, etc.., for my...
Either do what ChefEd says, or open your own vegan, gluten free cafe yourself. It wouldn't make it where I live, but I'll bet there are plenty of LA people who are into that. And there are a lot of people that can't eat gluten, there's got to be a niche market for what you are doing.
Sorry here you go, http://www.grinningplanet.com/2006/update-2005-05-24/pesticides-in-food.htm.   I don't know how accurate it is, but a registered dietician showed me this.
    This chart shows which foods are better to use organic versus non-organic. Although cantaloupe and honeydew are in different columns for some reason. And I would think that broccoli would suck up pesticides like a mop. But who knows? There are certified organic pesticides like rotenone and pyrethrin, but I bought some of those and the label said to wear a mask and gloves while using them.  So much for being healthier.
I use an Edgepro Apex 3. I read about it on cheftalk, and decided to give it a try. It's not cheap, around $225, but it comes with 5 stones, 120, 220, 320, 600, 1000, and it's easy to mantain a consistent angle, which is one of the most important things when sharpening. The grits on the stones are not standard, but you can look them up on the net and see how they compare to others.   The only complaint that I have is everybody wants me to sharpen their knives for...
I can guarantee that the shrimp that I buy from the shrimpers has never been frozen. They do put it on ice, but some of the shrimp are still literally kicking when I get them. It's easy to tell if shrimp have been previously frozen, the antennae (sp) usually fall off if they have been frozen. I've been out on several shrimp boats, and we used to cook some that were alive just as we peeled them, it doesn't get any better than that. It's nice to live a quarter of a mile...
I think the pre-packaged cocktail shrimp are probably pre-cooked. Buy uncooked frozen shrimp if you can't get fresh. I live on the Gulfcoast of Florida, and between the bay and gulf shrimp, we are literally swimming in them.
Almost all culinary schools have an extern or intern requirement, that is, you have to work somewhere for a semester or two, and you get a grade based on your Chef's recommendation.   That said, experience is a key to any profession, and the more you have, usually, the better you will be. And I totally agree with "trying before buying." Get a job or volunteer at a bakery and see if that is really what you want to do. Until then, take Foodpump's advice and read and...
I don't really see how Online lessons can work, unless you video your knife cuts, and then an instructor critiques them. They can't taste and look at your consommé and see if it is seasoned enough and clear. I think you would be better off ordering Jacques Pepin videos, and asking questions here, and it would be a whole lot cheaper than online tuition. For the price of online tuition, you could take several culinary classes at a community college and have an instructor...
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