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Posts by dcarch

I am not sure what you are looking for. There is no mystery in SV cooking frozen turkey. It is shockingly simple minded. I dump frozen turkey in a bag in hot water set at 145F. The machine knows how to keep the water temperature at 145F exactly, not 144F, and not 146F, for as long as I want. The entire turkey, can be small and can be very big, makes no difference, every molecule in the bird has no choice but to end up at 145F. There is no detailed method to tell you. The...
 Because you can control temperature to better than 1 degree accuracy in every part of the food, and if you are using the correct safety information for cooking temperature relative to the food you are cooking, your safety is guaranteed. With regular cooking methods you are always guessing, even if you are using a good thermometer you can't be sure if you are actually hitting the center or the coldest spot of your food. dcarch
Using SV to make yogurt and clotted cream is absolute control of your final results. Yogurt at 115F, 8 hours.Clotted cream at 180F, 10 hours. Both using a glass jar instead of bags. dcarch
When they incorporate precision digital temperature control, BBQ Guru, for the BGE, no one seems to have a problem, but for sous vide? instantly WW III breaks out!   There are many appliances have already incorporated digital temperature controls. 1 degree accuracy instead of 20 to 50 degrees of swing of all mechanical thermostats.   I also use my SV for making yogurt, clotted cream, ------------------. My smoker is PID controlled.   dcarch
Hahaa! you are in big trouble. Hide quick!  But you are not too far off, especially with an oven with circulating hot air (convection oven). dcarch 
 Actually it's exactly the other way around. All meats when cooked at lower temperature will shrink much less, therefore juicier.  dcarch
 I hope you didn't completely miss my point. I did not say to have deep fried potatoes at 100C oil, nor did I imply that baking potatoes at 100C is desirable. I was only trying to say that "IF", a big "IF", you subject food to the same temperature, the food would come out the same, regardless of source of heat (assuming also cooked at the same duration of time). The only exception is microwave heating, because it does not follow normal conductivity law of...
  That is true, but we are not talking about different things. Deep fry French fries at 100C will not give you crispy exterior, but inside will be the same as cooking in any other method at 100C.  Bake a raw potato at 100C will make the outside turn black is chemical oxidation, and again, the inside will be the same. The point is, food inside cannot tell what  the heat source is, there is no way it can tell what generates the 100C. Interesting that it does not matter how...
Obviously different methods will have different effects, otherwise there would not be a need for different appliances. The different effects are mostly from: a) humidity of the air of the heating environment - dry air accelerates evaporation. Evaporation cools down the food.  b) moisture of the exterior of the food - wet food takes longer to be heated up due to evaporation,c) porosity of the food - You can't make toast in boiling water.d) chemistry of food - a fat cap on a...
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