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Posts by BenRias

For my jalepenos seedlings, I started with just an average envelope of seeds I bought a couple of years back (old seeds=first strike against me.)  I put them in the soil with no special preparation (strike two against me) and eventually got two x 3" sprouts out of about 6 seeds that I planted.  I didn't do the whole testing the soil pH, drainage, pre-soaking the seeds, tenting or plastic cup to incubate them, etc.  as was recommended by a few people.  But that in no way...
Hey there!  There are a bunch of different ways to make great fajitas at home.  Here are a couple of tips that will help you:   1)Most importantly to get the right taste, you need to use the proper cooking technique.  To do the technique correctly in your home kitchen, prepare yourself for a smoky house and a slightly splattered stove-top.  So have your vent flowing and/or your windows/doors open--and be ready to fan your smoke alarms with towels if they are...
Another question for you that may be hard to answer: Do you have a single favorite cut of meat to cook with?  Maybe a better question would be do you have a favorite meat for each cooking method (e.g. smoking, grilling, bbq)?
Steven,    I am very excited to see you here on ChefTalk! I really fell for your foods through watching Primal Grill.  Best grilling/BBQ program on TV!  I have a few questions for you, but so others may participate in each topic, I will parse them out over a couple of different threads.     First, I am curious about who your cooking inspirations were?  Was there someone in your family or professionally that just got you excited to pursue grilling/bbq in depth?
Thanks for the responses!     The salsa was for a Cinco de Mayo fundraiser for a local scouting troop in Southern California.  It is a small troop, so I was really surprised by how many orders they took in.    For my original recipe measurements, I did them by weight.  I took my original recipe (which makes 1.5 portions), then followed the recommended procedure by the CIA in Professional Chef.  This means determining the Recipe Conversion Factor (RCF),...
I just wanted to share this experience for those who have also gone through this before when dramatically increasing a recipe's yield.I just completed a job where I made appx 100 take-home servings of fresh salsa, each container holding about 16 oz. While I have made this salsa in big batches in the past, this was the first time I had to make this much at one time. I scheduled everything as best as I could, and I did the appropriate math to increase my original recipe,...
Sorry for the delay in responding.  I haven't had computer access for a couple of days.  Before I wrote the last comment a few days ago, I searched all my travel books, but I could not remember the name.  Since nothing was jumping out at me during my search on the internet, I resorted to Google Earth to find it.  I zoomed around Kona until I found the Longs Drug Store.  Then I zoomed some more around the parking lot.  When the sites started looking familiar, I knew I was...
I know that this may be contradictory to your island vacation, but there is a very good French restaurant in Kona that was very good for a romantic night and/or just great food. Its called La Bourgogne.  As for breakfast, Aloha Angel Cafe was also pretty good and hearty. Sit on the patio if you can on a sunny morning.  There is also a plate-lunch place near a Longs Drugs but I can't remember the name of it.  But they had terrific crispy pork...it was BBQ pork with a red...
Wow! I am sorry I didn't see this sooner.  The larger Sonorencias tortillas, or sobaqueras (a bit larger), are a bit temperamental, but they are very doable for both home and restuarant use. It is hard to describe in words the exact process of making the giant tortillas/sobaqueras/sonorencias.  However, the key things you will need is a soft, smooth and looser dough than normal (requiring a touch more water, touch more lard, and touch less baking powder); as well as...
Another thing to consider in your dicing problems is not only knife sharpness, but also blade thickness. I have a number of good quality knives that can dice onions smoothly. But when I use my sharpened Henckels chef knife (a relatively thick/hefty blade), slicing horizontally through the onion is not as smooth as when I use my MAC Pro chefs knife, or my other Japanese blades (e.g. Tojiro chefs knife.) When slicing horizontally, you are basically inserting a wedge in...
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