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Posts by iplaywithfire

Everything that's been said is good advice IMO. Massaging helps a LOT for soreness as well. If you have the luxury of someone else willing to go near your over-worked tootsies, then, by all means, take advantage of that. If not, rub your own feet well regularly. Keep them clean no matter what. If it grosses you out to rub your own feet, then you're not taking good enough care of them, and don't ask someone else to do it for you if that's the case. I've never had a...
I still have intermittent problems with my back, feet, and shoulders from long hours.  Some of the things I find that help my body recover the most are:   1. Heat.  If you have access to a jaccuzi, use it!  Soak until you feel like you will melt.  Some people swear by epsom salt in addition, but it never seemed to make any difference for me.  It might be worth a try for you nevertheless.  If you dislike the idea of a bath, a heating pad or hot water bottle can help,...
  The soaking in the test is more to get at the question of how much and how quickly mushrooms absorb liquid.  For instance, if one were to have the task of preparing an entire case of mushrooms, and that person opted to rinse the mushrooms in water, not hand drying them one-by-one, then the majority of water on the surface will be absorbed as opposed to evaporated.  Given my test results, if one does not make sure to hand dry their mushrooms every two minutes (that's a...
  OK, you two, and perhaps a glass of wine (or two), got me curious enough to run my own Alton Brown test - I like the guy, I just don't always agree with him.   10 oz dry-brushed button mushrooms   rinsed in cold water, then soaked for two minutes (In hind-sight I should have weighed them right after rinsing and draining as well for more complete information)   drained, but not hand-dried: gain of 1.1 oz = 11% weight gain of water   thoroughly hand-dried: gain of .45...
Sounds like a good meal.  One of the tricks I learned, and still use - even though I haven't been a strict vegetarian for a long time now - for getting a really nice savory-meaty flavor into a dish without the liberal use of salty stuff like fermented bean sauce or meat substitution products is what I call shitake mushroom nibs.    Slice them thin, get a pan up to screaming heat, coat the pan generously with frying oil (about 1 TBLS oil per cup of sliced mushrooms),...
Roasted ham with apple-brandy-sage reduction.  Roasted garlic mashers.  Orange-cranberry (might toss some juniper in there) candied carrots.  Caramel creme brule with mulled peaches.  And, of course, the families obligatory fruit salad.  Sadly, I did not have the time to make some fresh bread this year. 
Way back when...   A waiter kept trying to nose onto my station.  My Sous went to the office and came back with a roll of duct tape.  He asked the waiter to step back four feet, then he proceeded to tape a line on the floor in front of, and to the one exposed side of my station.  Then he calmly explained that no one other than himself and myself were to walk beyond that line.    I miss that guy. 
Another alternative would be to cook off some of the alcohol before you add the booze in question to the mixture.  I make beer bread in that manner.  Wine generally has a much higher alcohol content than beer, so it would need to be cooked longer (or at a higher temperature) to evaporate more of the alcohol than with beer.  It's not necessary to evaporate all of the alcohol, but I think that if you cook it down to about 4 or 5% alcohol content, typical bread making yeast...
What's your leavening agent?  If it's yeast, the alcohol in the wine will inhibit growth.  You might need a higher concentration of yeast to counteract the inhibitor.  If it's not warm enough, it won't proof properly either. 
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