or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by SgtGoodie

In reply to post #124  by "Ol Kentuck" (I should have quoted the post) a Tablespoon is 3 teaspoons, so half a Tablespoon is 1 1/2 teaspoons. If you need to then add 1 more teaspoon the final measurement is 2 1/2 teaspoons.     1/2 (.5) Tablespoon + 1 teaspoon = 2 1/2 teaspoons    
Yeah that's why I was trying to find him a reliable formula using weights rather than sifting and measuring with cups and Tablespoons. I just pay the extra to use teh cake flour in the first place myself. Maybe I should give the DIY formula a try sometime. Thanks.
Thanks Pete. I'm sure the formula will help considerably. Do you have any thoughts as to the quality of the final product when using this kind of mixture versus using regular cake flour? Also it sounds like the 2 Tbsp formula from the Ehow article may be more in line with making Pastry flour which is slightly higher in protien content than cake flour. Any thoughts there?   I'm forwarding any and all info to my old friend, I appreciate the input and I'm sure he will...
Today a friend of mine asked how to make Cake flour out of General purpose flour so I did a web search and came up with an "Ehow" answer. It says to subtract 2 Tbsp out of every cup of flour to be used replacing it with cornstarch. I should mention that it says to sift the flour first before counting cups. I thought I would find a Lbs/oz's formula for him to use but there's no mention in either of my textbooks (Professional Chef- CIA nor Professional Baking- Wayne...
Here;'s a link to a place where you can find the different flours sold to the general public.     http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/flours/flours-and-grain-blends 
Cake flour "and" pastry flour are both "soft" flours containing lower amounts of protiens and thus produce less gluten which results in a more tender product. Harder flours such as straight flour, pattent and clear flour are high protien/gluten producing flours suited for crusted breads. General purpose flour is formulated to be slightly weaker than bread flours (hard) so that it can be used in pastries as well. A professional baker however, prefers to use flours that...
The cake boss is a joke. Not the man... the show. That guy can do some great things with a cake. You may notice whenever they have him positioned talking to the camera there are nice wedding cakes behind him. But the cakes they put on the show are junk. Creative... but junk. Wow we can roll fondant and cover things with it. We can mold fondant into shapes. We can make the thing smoke like a build ing on fire... crap! Put a bag in his hand and ask for a nice traditional...
That's some pretty technical stuff from Ms. Dean. Any less than average house wife would think to maybe even add a bit of salt and pepper to the pot (or saucepan).
Thanks Chefedb, I have to say I'm not a big fan of most TV cake shows. Toba said in her book that the use of marzipan is more of a European thing in her book. I noticed in Mich's book that she has either marzipan or chocolate plastique coverings under the outer icings quite often. She also has a quite impressive list of celebrities who have used her to make their wedding cakes. I want to taste the two along with the cake I'll be using before I decide which way to go. The...
I'm looking through my cake decor books and magazines again for some ideas. One of my books is by Mich Turner called (of course) "Wedding Cakes" and in her recipes I notice that all of the cake has two layers of frosting. One is a light yellowish tan color and the other is white and I remember in another book of mine called "The Well Decorated Cake" by Toba Garrett she covered a cake with marzipan and then many layers of royal icing achieving a vrey smooth finished look....
New Posts  All Forums: