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Posts by the-boy-nurse

Salt is at it's chemical essence sodium chloride. When dissolved into solution the chemical bond loosens and it becomes ionic sodium and ionic chlorine. Sodium and chlorine in elemental state are incredibly unstable and reactive and as a result highly toxic. But in ionic form necessary for life. My chemistry teacher would therefore comment the difference between life and death is one electron. Ionic sodium/chlorine is very stable and it's very unlikely that they are...
ChefBazookas' list is awesome- My vote is for Pavlov's, you might even add in bell- I'm drooling already.
I agree with Chefross. We're talking diffusion here, all solutes move to equalibrium across semipermeable membranes. Salt would diffuse itself from the higher concentration of the broth into the intracellular and extracellular fluid of whatever is in the soup, assuming the broth contains a higher concentration of salt. Vegetables with high volume of water like potatoes and carrots would have a more dramatic effect (theoretically) than drier ones like beans. Additionally...
Hey- I use the pampered chef large round baking stone (pre-heated in a 500 degree oven for an hour) and it works great. That's the only stone I have any experience w/ so don't know how it compares to others. It works well for me. Cooks pizza's in under 15 min, evenly, no sticking once its seasoned.  
Didn't know she was an actress, love her books though. Particularly fond of "From Curries to Kebabs..." I like the infusion of anthropology, geography, and history.  
Here Here- Couldn't agree more KYH- Cooking is like kissing, the only thing that matters is what the persons partaking of it think of it.    As for grannies cooking (or Mimi as she's known in my house)- My wife makes killer pie crust, It's the only pie crust I don't leave sitting as a broken smiley face on the plate when I'm finished eating. She learned to make pie crust from her grandmother. My wife has given that recipe to a few people and they always complain that...
  That was my original point, though I think you stated it better. Having an experience base with a wide range of spices and availability of those spices greatly enhances ones repertoire. Knowing from experience what flavors will work in combination is something that comes w/ practice. When a home cook starts leaving the measureing spoons in the drawer, when recipes become ideas to be improved upon rather than strict blueprints. - that's a good sign they have that...
  It's not like it's the last lamb on earth, this ain't the ark. Now if I had two lambs fight each other in a pit and ate the loser, then you could shoot me... I suppose if I wanna set my money on fire in the back yard that's my prerogative. Unless there's a no burning ordinance :). Lamb chops are a broad category, I wouldn't suggest buying butterfly rib chops, but shoulder or leg chops are cheap (comparatively) and not as pretty. BTW I'd be okay w/ being shot, but only...
My own personal bias-  try lamb, different and sooooo tasty. Cut some lamb chops or tenderloin into cubes, season w/ salt pepper and grill. Serve in pita/naan or other flat bread w/ tomato wedges and tettuce and some grilled onion. Top with a yogurt mint sauce like tzatziki or garlic sauce like scordalia (if too garlicky cut w/ yogurt.) BDL's recipe for scordalia is in this thread- I use a whole head of garlic but I dig lots of garlic.
  Okay it was a generalization, I don't put cumin in my guacamole. Just making the point that as a rule new home cooks are afraid to spice and season sufficiently.
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