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Posts by Slayertplsko

 I've heard of that theory. I just think it's complete nonsense. Why would anyone keep referring to realities of medieval times? Has there been some proper research into this? Could someone point me to a credible source? Also, while I'm not a native speaker of French, I don't think ''at room temperature'' captures the meaning of ''chambré'' very well. To me, ''chambré'' implies taking it out of cellar and bringing it to the room and let it sit there for some time.
 1, I think 22°C is way too warm for any red, however robust it may be. In fact, I've seen it written on Bordeaux reds to serve them at 16-18°C (just drank one such wine yesterday). 2, Of course room temperature is not, in the general sense, 16-18°C. However, when talking about wines, this is precisely what ''room temperature'' means. You can see it on the wine bottle labels: ''serve at room temperature (16 to 18 °C)''.
We all know that serving red wine at what is considered room temperature (depending on your definition, around 22°C) is complete nonsense. That's just way too warm. Instead, red wine should generally be served at around 16°C, with some types slightly warmer while others slightly cooler. And in wine terms this actually is called ''room temperature'' - you can even read it on the labels ''serve at room temperature (16°C to 18°C)''. So why do they call it ''room...
Hi there, I'm trying to come up with a really good version of pasta with salmon-and-cream sauce. That's the concept - pasta with salmon and cream in it. Otherwise, everything goes. So far it's only in my head but I would really like to know your ideas. So here's what I'm currently thinking:   The sauce: 1, The salmon must be either grilled or pan-seared (or any such dry-heat method for that matter) so that we get that nice contrast of crispy and tender/juicy. I will...
IDEA ONE Székelygulyás (pork and sauerkraut stew)   This is a traditional Hungarian dish and amazingly delicious. You'll need: Fatty pork (traditionally a combination of shoulder and belly), onions, garlic, lard, sweet Hungarian paprika, sauerkraut, crushed caraway, soured cream, flour. Saute about a pound of meat cut into cubes in lard, remove and reserve. Saute chopped onions (1/2 lbs). Saute a few chopped cloves of garlic. Add a tablespoon of paprika and saute for...
The reason I'm asking is a bit different, though.   You see, there aren't many Turkish cookbooks in English (or in French or in German for that matter) and mainly, there are very few GOOD Turkish cookbooks. But even those very few great books don't go very deep and simply don't and cannot cover the whole richness of Turkish cuisine. You don't see cookbooks about the cuisine of certain regions only, like you see for Italian, French or Spanish cuisines (Naples at Table,...
I'm interested in Turkish cuisine. So do we have any Turkish members?
This is the way I do it. I've based my recipe on Jacques Médecin's. By the way, if you read French, do get his book La cuisine du Comté de Nice. Amazing stuff. Actually, I think there is an English translation, too, although I don't know how good it is and if it's the whole book (sometimes it's really worth getting the original if possible as translations can be abridged).   1, Equal quantities of small aubergines, small courgettes, onions and green peppers (not bell...
THIS is the attitude I like (and share). :D
Thanks for your replies, guys.   I don't worry about customs. The over-zealousness of US customs officers is legendary all over the world, however, I'm from Slovakia and it's not a big deal here. On the other hand, we don't have good spice vendors. Those that do exist have pretty much the same stuff I can buy in a supermarket plus a few exotic spices.   I think I should concentrate on different kinds of Turkish pepper and paprika and maybe some kekik and mint. Maybe...
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