or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by gobblygook

Checking to see if I have this right.  If not, please correct me.   Fatback is from the area around the spine of the pig.   Salt pork and "back bacon" are made from fatback.  The difference being that salt pork is salt cured and "back bacon" is smoke cured.   Most of the bacon you see in the grocery store is made from the belly region, not the back.  The fat is softer in the belly and harder in the back region.    Did I get my "pig parts" right?
Could the lima beans be "shocked" into being brighter?     
To be clear, "domino's" isn't what he was referring to when he said "pizzeria".  Grande offers a premium product and marketing collateral to their customers.  They can buy Grande without plastering it all over the place, but the marketing collateral is there to "add value" to the product by advertising the use of premium ingredients.    Also, using a "blend" can be problematic.  Different cheeses melt differently.  Also, the "mix" itself varies from brand to brand. ...
I'm no expert, self-acclaimed or otherwise.  If you take a dried pasta, cook it until no longer crunchy, but still overly firm, pull it out of the pasta water and put in into the sauce (at a simmer) after a brief pause for draining, you will get a similar result to fresh pasta being finished with the sauce.  Any water remaining on the outside of the pasta will quickly steam off and the additional moisture still needed by the pasta to get to the correct stage of "done"...
McDonald's fries come from the McDonald's processor.  Everything is done to the fries except the final fry before they ever get to the restaurant.    
The reason I'm trying to avoid "cajun" recipes is that they tend to be either fried or a stew preparation.  There is a chain (in TX at least) called Razoo's.  While the food is acceptable, it feels like everything is breaded with the same seasonings and fried.  A lot of restaurants that are weighted toward fried foods have the same issue -- they find one "signature breading" and everything is coated in it.  You end up with 20 different dishes that taste much the same.  I...
I'm specifically trying to avoid "cajun" recipes.  So far, all I'm finding is frying chunks of meat or being part of a stew concoction.  I'm looking for ideas where alligator can be the "star" of the plate.  I'm really doing my research in the wrong order, since I've never actually seen alligator meat.  My assumption is that it should be able to be grilled, braised, etc.  Perhaps I'm just way off base, but if I'm going to get alligator meat, I want to taste the...
I'm not sure if my mind-wandering will be useful, but I'll give it a shot.   Bacon seems to have two general purposes.  The first is a crispiness that just isn't achieved with other meats, and the second is the fat.  While braising would render a fair amount of the fat, I'm not sure how this cooking process would add to the meat in any way.  There are also better methods of rendering the fat if the fat is what you're after.  Cooking as a hunk of meat would also...
  I guarantee you it was a man who modified one and made a "nursing bra".  Where were those in high school?  flop and drop...    
I've seen fried rice noodles as a garnish for several different Asian-style dishes.  Way back when, Olive Garden made pasta in-house (at least some of it).  When they added the spinach artichoke dip, they used "fried pasta chips" as the item to dip into the dip.  They were actually pretty good.  In this case, they were about the size of a Frito "Scoop", actually, a little larger.  I can see taking a piece of fresh pasta, frying it up and using it as something to stick up...
New Posts  All Forums: