New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Someday

I'm confused as to why you aren't getting proper training on the job when this happens. Unless the kitchen is a complete cluster-f I assume that there is a chef who is supposed to be showing you what to do and how to handle the orders.    How did you follow along when you were in garde manger? The principle is basically the same, just the timing is different. A good rule of thumb for saute is to build your pans and get them going ASAP, so that when the fire is called you...
 
40 minutes once it hits core temp I believe is accurate, I'll double check later EDIT: I did indeed check and the time for pasteurization is 40-45 minutes depending on fat content of the chicken. Keep in mind in my post above I stipulated about 40 minutes from the time the core hits temp, not 40 minutes total.
I'm convinced many of those are joke reviews, akin to the fake/funny reviews you'll see on amazon sometimes. 
It is most likely a fluid gel..agar agar can go a long way for clarity, similar to other gelling agents like pectin.
Most likely culprit is the quality of the steak.    Sometimes a very very rare (read, actually raw) steak can be kind of chewy, but if you think you hit a good rare or medium rare temp then I don't think that would be the problem.    Like I said, most likely you bought ungraded beef, or just got unlucky with an inferior piece. And you are sure it was a ribeye?
 I don't understand the point you are trying to make? Are you trying to call me out for contradicting myself or something?  I only gave two times in your example above, which was for chicken breast and duck breast. The reason chicken has to cook for so long at 138 is to pasteurize it so that you get a 7-log10 reduction in bacteria. This really takes about 40 minutes to do that (once the core temp reaches 138). I pad this time out since it won't reduce quality for a chicken...
 I don't understand your comment about checking the internal temperature...if you sous vide at a controlled temperature it will be the same internal temp as the water bath....
A tender protein that is ready to cook and eat (think most steak, chops, chicken breast, etc) would easily cook within a 30-40 minute time window, assuming it wasn't too big.    I also think that on shows like Iron Chef they only have to plate 1 of each, then they get extra time to make the judge's plates and finish the dishes.    An egg should take no longer than 45 mins to an hour.   But basically any protein that you can cook, say, on a grill or in a saute pan can...
My point was that a lot of cooks I've worked with over the years throw some vegetables into a hot pan, stir it around for 30 seconds, and call that a sweat. It just takes more time than most cooks and chefs seem willing to spend doing it.    Otherwise the method is as @French Fries described. I often use a cartouche but it's not mandatory. 
New Posts  All Forums: