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Posts by Someday

You can't make sandwiches but burgers are OK? Lol, a burger IS a sandwich. Anyways...   I still think your best bet is some mix of chicken and/or pork and starch thickening. I know its easy for me to say not being in your situation and all, but I would commit to making from scratch gravy and stay away from bases. They just aren't any good. 
 Usually steaks and other meats (and veggies too) are pre-cooked and then chilled in an ice bath. For service the protein is placed in a water bath (lower than the cook temp, so say like 120-130F) to re-heat. This is usually done when the customer orders it. Usually on the fire a finishing technique is used (searing, grilling, etc) to complete it.  Fish, at least in my experience, is done a la minute sous vide, since the temp is lower and the time is much less.  I think...
A roux is a mixture of equal parts (by weight) of fat and flour. Fat is commonly butter (clarified if you want to get technical) but any fat will do.    Either the roux or the liquid should be cold/room temp. You add cold roux to hot/warm liquid, or pour cold/room temp liquid over hot roux (a little at a time).    It has to do with the gelatinization of the starches in the flour (in essence, if they get too hot too fast, the starch gelatinizes around itself, creating...
You might also try a thinner initial liquid to account for reduction and splitting. If the sauce gets too reduced in the casserole it can separate out that way. If anyones every over-reduced an alfredo or other cream sauce you might know what I mean.    Flour should give you some protection against splitting but it won't last forever. You also might try adding a bit of cream to the mix as well...it has natural emulsifying agents that may work with the cheese and other...
Veal bones are crazy expensive. Beef bones should be cheaper, dunno if you've tried those.   I like chefwriter's idea of using chicken bones. Are you thickening with anything other than reduction? You could make a really tasty sauce with chicken stock and inexpensive beef scraps. Cut up, roast, deglaze with whatever and then chicken stock. Simmer gently for a few hours. Strain, thicken.    Pork might be an option too. Don't think it is "traditional," but I bet you...
  I dunno, lol. If you buy good ground beef, season it well, fresh veg, use a good bun, and cook it right...you'd probably beat like 90% of other burgers out there. There are TONS of shit burgers out there. Sometimes it feels like just making a DECENT burger is a pretty big accomplishment. 
I just recently visited a local small slaughterhouse/processing facility (pork and beef) and they absolutely had a mandated USDA inspector there. I'm pretty sure the plant has to pay his salary, but that is nothing new.    Dunno about poultry, this topic is about beef.    Again, my assertion that the "liver" taste coming from blood left in the meat stands. Improper or NO bleeding of the animal is rare. Not saying it never happens, but its in no way common. Isolated...
Yeah. I had to google what the hell that was. Is it kind of like Qualuudes?
My understanding is that if you make salary then you don't get paid overtime. If you make hourly then you should make overtime when you go above 40 hours a week.    This isn't the best place to come for legal advice...there are lots of smart people here that may know the answers (or maybe just think they do) but nothing is for sure. You should look up laws for your state and then proceed with a lawyer if you need to. 
 Yeah, what? No USDA inspector would allow slaughter where the animal isn't bled out properly. Also, if there was blood left in the meat it would spoil WAAAY faster, and the meat would most likely be speckled with blood....and it would be obvious to the person who is cooking it that there is blood in it.  Don't confuse the liquid inside meat and/or the cryovac bag with blood--certainly not the case.  I'm not sure what you are talking about. Are you really under the...
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