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Posts by ChrisBelgium

I forgot to mention an interesting artist who used straight lines and... the Golden Ratio more than you think; Piet Mondriaan. Look for yourself how these lines are divided, how these lines create shapes (=patterns) and how these shapes relate to each other in sizes...     When you do a search for Mondriaan on the internet and look for images, you will notice that this artist was and still is many times copied in fashion, architecture and... in food. However, we have...
My goal on previous posts was to make readers aware of some theory that is used in the art world and make it all understandable and easy to use in plating. Awareness is the first step toward change. I hope maybe some readers will take it a step further. I spoke of elements, not specific food items, to keep the focus on composition and nothing else.   To make a short workable résumé; - use smaller elements by cutting too large items on a plate in smaller ones (something...
 You're very right, Ed! I know in old-school and maybe also new-school presentations, you always have to keep a distance from the outer border. In fact, when applying diagonals plus the Golden Ratio, htere's little or no chance you will never plate onto the rim of a plate or platter.I heard in modern plating (probably when using large 32cm plates) you never let the different components touch each other. Don't know any explanation nor why that should make a difference.
 I'm quite convinced that talented artistic people in the first place and maybe a lot other people use the Golden ratio without even knowing it. It is such a natural thing. Even in the way new leaves grow on a tree, related to the angle of the previous leaf, have a perfect Golden Ratio. Is it thé answer to all questions about artful positioning and composition? Absolutely not imo, taste is such an individual and subjective thing. It would simply rule out any other or new...
Steamed salmon and cod served on pea purée with cherry tomatoes and preserved lemons   JP, seems we were playing with the same ingredients; fish and peas. And, you, Haiden and me, 3 fish dishes on a row, what's happening? Lent? I used frozen (fresh) peas boiled in slightly salted water with a shallot added and a few lemon verbena leaves. Cooled in cold water, mixed with sour cream, lots of s&p, then warmed again for serving. The fish is steamed, then cut in these...
  The fact that I don't like a combination of two elements placed far apart from each other is a very personal preference, well actually it's a dislike. But indeed, it creates a "tension" like you mentioned, eastshores. In the same way as intended "misplacing" of one element in a perfect symmetry or pattern, or use another color. Also, like PP says, there are situations in which you need to work with only 2 elements, like in a dessert. The shape of a plate, like a...
Eastshores, there is indeed a lot to be told about balance; by volume, by positioning, by combining colors, by shapes and color of the plates and by shapes and colors of the food etc. Haven't thought about all of that yet, but I guess thinking about it is already a step into finding new perspectives and insights.     The example in the above set of drawings is striking imo. The left composition doesn't work at all, maybe if you would change one color or shape....
Lots of identical symmetric lines combined often create a "pattern". Good examples are the stunning potato dishes that ordo posted. Patterns act like an entire unit imo. You could emphasis the created pattern by adding a color, like in the bottom right example in the following set of drawings. Another pattern can be created by making cross intersections like in the bottom middle drawing. In the whole first row of drawings I tried to look at what uneven symmetrical lines...
Experimental Garbanzo Burger   I know there are all kinds of "veggie" burgers for sale everywhere but I never ate one. This thread is a good stimulant to try to make one, and, I love kitchen experiments. So here's my attempt in making a "Garbanzo Burger". My first thought was to grind half of the cooked garbanzos coarsely and the other half as fine as possible, almost like a paste, which would serve as the component that kept everything together.     Here's what I...
I tried that before, ordo. Ketchup works better  
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